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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, February 13, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Tesla, New York Times Dustup The CEO of electric car maker Tesla is accusing The New York Times of deception in a negative review of the company's plug-in sedan. Tesla's Model S sedan conked out in cold weather before the Times reviewer could complete his trip between Connecticut and Washington D.C. Tesla's Elon Musk claims the reporter failed to disclose that he didn't follow charging instructions and took an extended detour. The Times says the trip was described accurately, "exactly as it occurred." Regardless of the facts, the timing of the dustup can't help Tesla. The company is under pressure to improve its financial performance and reports fourth quarter earnings in 10 days.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Jill Bolte Taylor At the age of 37, Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor had a massive stroke and watched as her brain functions - motion, speech, memory, linear thinking and self-awareness - shut down one by one. After a long and successful rehabilitation, she has become a spokesperson for the possibility of full recovery from brain injury. In her bestselling book "My Stroke of Insight," Bolte chronicles her recovery as well as her personal study of perception as it differs between left brain processing and right brain experiencing. Bolte is the national spokesperson for the Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center and is an active member and supporter ofq the National Alliance on Mental Illness. She spoke with Thomas Goetz at the Herbst Theatre on January 28, 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition 'Working Late' in Life The traditional retirement age is 65. But many Americans are working far beyond that. Like a TV producer who became a fitness trainer in his 50s, and is still doing it at 73. The show's series "Working Late" looks at life on the job after retirement age.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Bay Area Traffic Congestion Ties L.A.'s Bay Area residents might find it hard to mock Los Angeles for its traffic congestion anymore. A recent report ranks the San Francisco-Oakland area right alongside L.A. for traffic delays, second only to Washington, D.C. Bay Area commuters waste 61 hours per year sitting in their cars because of congestion. Where is the worst traffic in the Bay? And what does so much idling mean for drivers and the environment?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Has the Military Abandoned Osama bin Laden's Shooter? The Navy SEAL who says he killed Osama bin Laden has left the service and, according to a new profile in Esquire magazine, now feels abandoned by the military, with inadequate health coverage, no pension and no security detail. We talk with Phil Bronstein, the author of the piece, about the details of bin Laden's shooting and the hardships faced by even the most elite military personnel when they return to civilian life. And we discuss the controversy surrounding the article. Critics say the piece mischaracterizes the services the government provides to veterans. Among other charges, they say the article failed to acknowledge the health benefits to which bin Laden's shooter is entitled.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Political Junkie Ken Rudin joins the show to talk sequestration, a squabble over Chuck Hagel in the Senate, Jesse Jackson, Jr.'s plea deal. Also, two presidential speech writers review President Obama's State of the Union message.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air A Biography of the Dead Sea Scrolls Between 1947 and 1956, manuscripts were found in caves near the Dead Sea, dating back to before the time of Jesus. Terry Gross talks about what was in them and who wrote them with John Collins, author of "The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Biography."
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Forgotten Contest to Host the U.N. Post-World War II America was to be home for the fledgling United Nations. Before New York got the nod, hundreds of other cities and towns vied for the honor of building the world capital. The show looks at the forgotten contest to host the U.N.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Cold War Comes to the Small Screen Spies, socialists and the fear of Soviet invasion aren't just history to the creators of the new FX show, "The Americans."
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Raising the Minimum Wage? -- In Tuesday's State of the Union address, President Obama proposed raising the minimum wage to $9 an hour. He also said he wanted to see the minimum wage indexed for inflation. Would raising the minimum wage help or hurt job creation?
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Cold War Comes to the Small Screen Spies, socialists and the fear of Soviet invasion aren't just history to the creators of the new FX show, "The Americans."
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air A Biography of the Dead Sea Scrolls Between 1947 and 1956, manuscripts were found in caves near the Dead Sea, dating back to before the time of Jesus. Terry Gross talks about what was in them and who wrote them with John Collins, author of "The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Biography."
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials The Art of Winning with Dr. Maya Angelou This special program features conversations with Maya Angelou and African-American winners from the Olympics, Grammys, Academy Awards, Pulitzer Prize and Nobel Prize categories. Presidential Medal of Freedom Award, Tony and Grammy Award-winner Maya Angelou will weave the stories of current African-American accomplishments together with our history. Angelou will include her unique, poetic insights regarding the history of the recognition of successful African-Americans nationally and internationally.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Has the Military Abandoned Osama bin Laden's Shooter? The Navy SEAL who says he killed Osama bin Laden has left the service and, according to a new profile in Esquire magazine, now feels abandoned by the military, with inadequate health coverage, no pension and no security detail. We talk with Phil Bronstein, the author of the piece, about the details of bin Laden's shooting and the hardships faced by even the most elite military personnel when they return to civilian life. And we discuss the controversy surrounding the article. Critics say the piece mischaracterizes the services the government provides to veterans. Among other charges, they say the article failed to acknowledge the health benefits to which bin Laden's shooter is entitled.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Japanese Shout Valentines Japanese men are said to have a problem expressing their feelings -- and perhaps that's why an increasing number of Japanese women say they're disillusioned with marriage. One potential solution to this problem is to have men shout out their love for their partners, karaoke-style.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Stranded Cruise Ship For passengers aboard the Carnival Triumph, a four-day pleasure cruise has turned into a nightmare. The ship lost power in the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday and is being slowly towed to port in Alabama. The company says it's working to ensure safety and passenger comfort. But onboard, passengers say toilets aren't working, food is scarce and conditions are horrible.
Wednesday, February 13, 2013

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