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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, February 8, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, February 8, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Another U.S. Drone Strike in Pakistan There was another U.S. drone strike in northwest Pakistan on Wednesday.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials America Abroad Obama's Foreign Policy Challenges -- What are the key foreign policy challenges for the Obama administration as the president's second term begins? The program travels to Brussels, the European Union's de-facto capital to examine the potential impact of a free trade agreement between the U.S. and E.U. The show also hears how the Syrian civil war is destabilizing other countries in the Mideast, with tens of thousands of refugees seeking refuge outside Syria, and discusses other Mideast hotspots, including Iran and Egypt. And what is the U.S. strategy in the Asia-Pacific region, where territorial disputes and new Chinese leaders are a major concern?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Remembering the Kennedys' 50 Mile Walk President John F. Kennedy made physical fitness a national priority. That included his inner circle. When he challenged his staff to walk 50 miles, his attorney general accepted -- his brother, Robert Kennedy. A former Kennedy staffer remembers that long walk, 50 years later.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we're watching dances by black choreographers, and dressing up for Mardi Gras.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum The Future of the U.S. Postal Service The United States Postal Service this week announced it will no longer deliver mail on Saturdays, starting this summer. The USPS is deep in the red, and taking Saturdays off is expected to save about $2 billion per year. But will that money be enough to save the postal service? Should it dip into its pension fund, or even privatize? We talk about what options remain for the USPS, and about a local push to save the historic Downtown Berkeley Post Office from being sold.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Lyrics Born: 'Yes, Bay Area' When rapper and producer Tom Shimura (aka Lyrics Born) was at UC Davis, he and his friends at the campus radio station found they shared a taste for innovative, underground hip-hop. The group, which also included artists like DJ Shadow and Blackalicious, went on to create the influential SoleSides record label. Today, Berkeley-based Lyrics Born performs around the world, and his music is heard frequently in movies, video games and TV shows like HBO's "Entourage." He joins us to talk about his latest album, and his new ebook "Yes, Bay Area," a selection of his locally flavored tweets from the past few years.
  • 10:30 am
    Forum Rob Corddry on Comedy, Clowns and Zombie Love Actor and writer Rob Corddry is perhaps best-known for his stint as a popular correspondent on "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." Corddry went on to appear in hit movies like "Hot Tub Time Machine," and he won a 2012 Emmy for his medical drama-spoof "Children's Hospital." We'll check in with Corddry about his career, his new horror film "Warm Bodies" and how his wife taught him how to speak like a zombie. Corddry performs at SF Sketchfest this Saturday.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Do You Own Your Data? Your phone knows where you are. Facebook knows who your friends are, and what you had for dinner. But how much of that information do you have control of? Host Ira Flatow and guests discuss ownership and personal data online.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Sleep and Memory / 'Isaac's Eye' We spend a lot of time sleeping. But how much rest do you really need? The show looks at sleep and its connection to learning and memory. Also, what would Isaac Newton be like if he were alive today? Host Ira Flatow talks with the playwright behind "Isaac's Eye," a new re-imagining of Newton and his struggles.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Tyler Perry Terry Gross talks with actor, director, screenwriter and producer Tyler Perry. His thriller "Alex Cross," in which he stars as a detective/psychologist, is now out on DVD. It's an unusual role for Perry, who is best known for Madea, the character he created in part after his mother, and the star of his popular though not critically acclaimed films including "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," "Madea's Family Reunion" and others. He plays Madea in drag, and often plays many of the other characters in the films. Perry's films have been criticized for perpetuating racial stereotypes. Perry owns his own production company and last year Forbes magazine named him as one of the best-paid men in entertainment. He recently signed up with Oprah Winfrey to develop scripted TV shows for her OWN network.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Israel's New Hard-liners in Parliament Israel's newly elected parliament has a kind of Tea Party edge: a record number of freshman representatives. Many of them sit far to the right. And for the first time, a Jewish settler from the most ideological West Bank settlement has a seat in the Knesset. Hard-liners hope that means more settlements - and peace activists are cringing. The show looks at the rise of Hebron representative Orit Struk.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Gun Shops, Stuck in the Middle While some lawmakers continue to push for universal background checks, others say it's a step too far. And gun shops are stuck in the middle.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine In the Salinas Valley, most farmworkers are from Mexico -- and an increasing number are indigenous people from Oaxaca and other Mexican states. They speak languages like Mixteco, Zapoteco and Triqui. If they speak Spanish at all, it's as a second language. That can create complex language barriers in work, school and health care. Now, one community hospital is bridging the language barrier for Mexican immigrants who don't speak Spanish.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Prop 8 Amicus -- Will the Department of Justice file an amicus brief in the Proposition 8 gay rights case to be argued in March before the Supreme Court? That case seeks to overturn the proposition, a voter initiative that banned same-sex marriage in California. It presents some tough choices for the Obama administration. It is expected to issue a brief; the question may be how sweeping that brief is in defending the right to marry.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine In the Salinas Valley, most farmworkers are from Mexico -- and an increasing number are indigenous people from Oaxaca and other Mexican states. They speak languages like Mixteco, Zapoteco and Triqui. If they speak Spanish at all, it's as a second language. That can create complex language barriers in work, school and health care. Now, one community hospital is bridging the language barrier for Mexican immigrants who don't speak Spanish.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Tyler Perry Terry Gross talks with actor, director, screenwriter and producer Tyler Perry. His thriller "Alex Cross," in which he stars as a detective/psychologist, is now out on DVD. It's an unusual role for Perry, who is best known for Madea, the character he created in part after his mother, and the star of his popular though not critically acclaimed films including "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," "Madea's Family Reunion" and others. He plays Madea in drag, and often plays many of the other characters in the films. Perry's films have been criticized for perpetuating racial stereotypes. Perry owns his own production company and last year Forbes magazine named him as one of the best-paid men in entertainment. He recently signed up with Oprah Winfrey to develop scripted TV shows for her OWN network.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Sonia Sotomayor The first Hispanic and third woman appointed to the United States Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor has become an instant American icon. Now, with candor and intimacy, she recounts the arc of her life from a Bronx housing project to an appointment on the nation's highest court. Sotomayor graduated from Princeton in 1976 and from Yale Law School in 1979. In May 2009, President Obama nominated her as an associate justice of the Supreme Court, a role she assumed in August 2009. Justice Sotomayor talks about her new book "My Beloved World" with M. Elizabeth Magill, dean and Richard E. Lang professor of law at Stanford Law School.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum The Future of the U.S. Postal Service The United States Postal Service this week announced it will no longer deliver mail on Saturdays, starting this summer. The USPS is deep in the red, and taking Saturdays off is expected to save about $2 billion per year. But will that money be enough to save the postal service? Should it dip into its pension fund, or even privatize? We talk about what options remain for the USPS, and about a local push to save the historic Downtown Berkeley Post Office from being sold.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine In the Salinas Valley, most farmworkers are from Mexico -- and an increasing number are indigenous people from Oaxaca and other Mexican states. They speak languages like Mixteco, Zapoteco and Triqui. If they speak Spanish at all, it's as a second language. That can create complex language barriers in work, school and health care. Now, one community hospital is bridging the language barrier for Mexican immigrants who don't speak Spanish.
  • 11:30 pm
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Soccer Scandal A European police agency this week made what should have been a startling announcement: Hundreds of professional soccer matches around the world may have been rigged by gamblers in recent years. But the news was greeted inside the sport less as a shock than confirmation of a rampant problem.
Friday, February 8, 2013

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