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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, February 5, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Iran Targets Online Activists Since the brutal crackdown on dissent that followed Iran's 2009 elections, pro-democracy activists have taken their activities to the digital world. But with another election approaching in June, the authorities have aggressively stepped up their efforts to identify and target online activists inside the country, and make life difficult for those in exile. Analysts say the government is using sophisticated methods to shrink the online space for free expression, although it's a much tougher task than preventing or controlling street protests.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) The Politics of Energy: An Issue of International Security Energy plays a vital role in all aspects of modern economies from transportation to communication, from health care to national defense systems. That reliance on energy creates vulnerabilities and competition over its supply, and plays an important role in every country's national security. The program's guest is Michael Levi, senior fellow for energy and the environment and director of the Program on Energy Security and Climate Change at the Council on Foreign Relations. He'll examine the key drivers affecting the global energy landscape and their implications for international security. How will the global community collectively achieve a peaceful transition to a sustainable energy future?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Limitations of Family Leave The Family and Medical Leave Act was a milestone. It gave American workers time off for a new baby, or a family illness. But 20 years later, many employees don't get those benefits, including those who work part-time, work for a small business or just can't afford unpaid leave.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum King Richard III's Remains Found Five-hundred years after he died in battle, scientists have discovered the skeleton of King Richard III under a British parking lot. The short-reigned monarch is known as a Machiavellian hunchback who purportedly committed atrocious murders on his journey to the throne. But the king has modern day supporters who say he was unfairly maligned both by the Tudor monarchs who succeeded him and in William Shakespeare's portrayal. We discuss the finding and the legacy of King Richard III.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum SF Weighs Requiring Soft-Story Earthquake Retrofits Thousands of San Francisco's so-called soft-story homes -- three-story or higher wood-frame buildings built before 1978 -- are vulnerable to earthquakes. On Tuesday, the city's Board of Supervisors will look at a proposal to mandate earthquake retrofitting of these structures by 2020.
  • 10:00 am
    NPR News NPR Coverage of President Obama's Statement on the Nation's Finances President Obama will be making a statement about the nation's finances, just a day after he signed a debt-ceiling bill suspending the nation's borrowing limit until May 18. "Forum" will be pre-empted at 10 am, so NPR can provide anchored coverage of the president's speech.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday What Counts as Torture? The Oscar-nominated film "Zero Dark Thirty" opens with a declaration that the story is based on first-hand accounts of actual events. But lawmakers like Senator Dianne Feinstein take issue with the film's depictions of torture and want the film branded as fiction. The show discusses the shifting opinions on what does and doesn't count as torture.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Mixed-Status Families Millions of families around the United States are what's known as "mixed-status." They live in one household, in which some family members are in the country as legal residents, and the others aren't. For those families, Washington's plans for immigration reform are less theoretical and more personal.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air From Age Seven to '56 and Up' Terry Gross talks with film director Michael Apted. "56 Up" is the latest in his series of documentary films following a group of English school children from the age of seven on up. Every seven years he returns to the group to film them. This is his eighth film in the series. Apted is also the director of the films "Coal Miner's Daughter," "Gorillas in the Mist," "Nell," "Amazing Grace" and "Continental Divide." The show also hears from Nicholas Hitchon, one of the subjects in the films.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Why Tequila Needs Bats Tequila is made from the agave plant -- and agave reproduces with the help of bats. Now, a Mexican biologist tells his countrymen if they want to save tequila, they'd better protect bats.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Algorithm Makes All the Difference Online dating just wasn't working for Amy Webb. So she devised her own algorithm, and found the perfect match
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Targeted Killings Memo Leaks -- A white paper from the Justice Department says the U.S. has the right to kill Americans who are al-Qaida operatives, even if they are not actively working on a terrorist plot. The memo leaked a few days before the confirmation hearing of John Brennan to head the CIA.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Algorithm Makes All the Difference Online dating just wasn't working for Amy Webb. So she devised her own algorithm, and found the perfect match
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air From Age Seven to '56 and Up' Terry Gross talks with film director Michael Apted. "56 Up" is the latest in his series of documentary films following a group of English school children from the age of seven on up. Every seven years he returns to the group to film them. This is his eighth film in the series. Apted is also the director of the films "Coal Miner's Daughter," "Gorillas in the Mist," "Nell," "Amazing Grace" and "Continental Divide." The show also hears from Nicholas Hitchon, one of the subjects in the films.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Jared Diamond Jared Diamond is a devoted conservationist, a professor of geography at UCLA and the celebrated author of "Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed" and "Guns, Germs, and Steel," winner of the 1998 Pulitzer Prize. In his newest book, "The World Until Yesterday," Diamond draws on his own four decades of fieldwork in New Guinea and adjacent Pacific islands, and asks what can be learned from "traditional" societies that will improve the way we live and the world we live in. Jared Diamond appeared in conversation with Roy Eisenhardt on January 24, 2013.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum King Richard III's Remains Found Five-hundred years after he died in battle, scientists have discovered the skeleton of King Richard III under a British parking lot. The short-reigned monarch is known as a Machiavellian hunchback who purportedly committed atrocious murders on his journey to the throne. But the king has modern day supporters who say he was unfairly maligned both by the Tudor monarchs who succeeded him and in William Shakespeare's portrayal. We discuss the finding and the legacy of King Richard III.
  • 10:30 pm
    Forum SF Weighs Requiring Soft-Story Earthquake Retrofits Thousands of San Francisco's so-called soft-story homes -- three-story or higher wood-frame buildings built before 1978 -- are vulnerable to earthquakes. On Tuesday, the city's Board of Supervisors will look at a proposal to mandate earthquake retrofitting of these structures by 2020.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Justice Dept. Sues S&P for Billions The Justice Department may seek as much as $5 billion from Standard and Poor's. In a lawsuit filed last night, prosecutors accuse the firm of misleading investors with fraudulent credit ratings on dozens of different mortgage bonds. It's not yet clear whether federal officials plan to file a similar suit against the other big rating firms, Moody's and Fitch. Regulators would like to see the industry be more competitive and less dependent on the firms whose securities they are rating.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Why Is It So Hard To Make A 100 Percent American Hand Dryer? The Xlerator high-speed hand dryer was invented and designed in the U.S. Today, a workforce of close to 40 people assembles it in East Longmeadow, Mass. Almost all of its components are made in America, except for the motor, which is made in Asia. Robert Siegel looks at why, in a product such as the hand dryer, manufacturers find it nearly impossible to be 100 percent American made.
Tuesday, February 5, 2013

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