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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, February 4, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, February 4, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Tech Nation Jared Diamond Host Moira Gunn talks with Jared Diamond about his new book "The World Until Yesterday: What We Can Learn from Traditional Societies."
  • 1:00 am
    Cambridge Forum Jared Diamond Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jared Diamond discusses his latest book, "The World Until Yesterday." Diamond argues that today's traditional societies represent a window onto the human world as it was only yesterday, measured against a time scale of the 6,000,000 years of human evolution. Traditional lifestyles are what shaped us, but there are profound differences between so-called traditional societies and industrial or post-industrial societies in everything from the way we count to the way we meet strangers. What can we learn from the world of yesterday as we negotiate the new challenges of the modern world?
  • 1:30 am
    Latino USA Immigration Reform, Served Two Ways Two proposals for comprehensive immigration reform were released this week, from a bipartisan Senate committee and from President Obama. As we launch into political negotiations for more detailed plans, is this a breakthrough? Or are we headed to another impasse as in previous years? The show talks with New York Times reporter Julia Preston about the developing plans.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Fannie Mae Bailouts At least 10 million homeowners aren't feeling the love of the housing market's recovery. That is, they still have underwater mortgages where they owe more than their homes are worth. But some borrowers were thrown a life raft this week. Mortgage heavyweights Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have announced a bailout program for struggling homeowners who are current on their payments. If there's a pressing need to leave their property, they can just walk away.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Tony Kushner on Maurice Sendak's Last Book Before he died, Maurice Sendak left behind a new project, "My Brother's Book." His friend Tony Kushner says it's probably the only thing Sendak wrote that's more for adults than children. Tony Kushner discusses the book Maurice Sendak left behind.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Super Bowl XLVII: Post Game Show Our panel of Monday morning quarterbacks analyzes Sunday's Super Bowl matchup in New Orleans between the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Calif. High Court Considers Pot Club Bans Should local governments in California have the power to ban medical marijuana outlets? That's the question the state Supreme Court will take up on Tuesday in a closely watched case. Meanwhile, things are heating up in Oakland, where the Harborside Health Center marijuana dispensary faces possible closure by the U.S. Justice Department. We get the latest on the state's pot wars.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum 'The Little Book of Heartbreak' Author Meghan Laslocky thought she had it bad when it came to love: she's been dumped 12 times. But then she discovered that Ernest Hemingway stole his wife's job when their marriage was collapsing. And that Lord Byron sent a breakup letter to his girlfriend, and had his new lover sign it. Laslocky joins us to talk about her new work "The Little Book of Heartbreak," and the history of lost love in movies, art and literature. What was your worst breakup? And how did you cope?
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Descended From Slaves and Slave-Owners Terry Gross talks with writer Andrea Stuart, author of the new book "Sugar in the Blood: A Family's Story of Slavery and Empire." Stuart traces her family history, descending from both slave owners and slaves. She was born and raised in Barbados, in the Caribbean. The island was one of Britain's earliest and most profitable colonies in the New World, thanks to the cultivation of sugar and the slaves who harvested it.
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace How Retailers Track You, Even Offline Online, retailers use tracking cookies to keep tabs on your preferences. Now, stores have found a way to track you offline, too.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Sheriffs Divided Over Guns -- County sheriffs are divided over whether to support gun control in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. More than 200 county sheriffs and several state sheriff associations have come out in opposition of gun control -- and some say they will refuse to enforce any new laws they believe violate the Second Amendment. The National Sheriffs' Association is working with the White House on gun control and says the dissenting sheriffs are just a small fraction of the total membership.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace How Retailers Track You, Even Offline Online, retailers use tracking cookies to keep tabs on your preferences. Now, stores have found a way to track you offline, too.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Descended From Slaves and Slave-Owners Terry Gross talks with writer Andrea Stuart, author of the new book "Sugar in the Blood: A Family's Story of Slavery and Empire." Stuart traces her family history, descending from both slave owners and slaves. She was born and raised in Barbados, in the Caribbean. The island was one of Britain's earliest and most profitable colonies in the New World, thanks to the cultivation of sugar and the slaves who harvested it.
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) The Politics of Energy: An Issue of International Security Energy plays a vital role in all aspects of modern economies from transportation to communication, from health care to national defense systems. That reliance on energy creates vulnerabilities and competition over its supply, and plays an important role in every country's national security. The program's guest is Michael Levi, senior fellow for energy and the environment and director of the Program on Energy Security and Climate Change at the Council on Foreign Relations. He'll examine the key drivers affecting the global energy landscape and their implications for international security. How will the global community collectively achieve a peaceful transition to a sustainable energy future?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum 'The Little Book of Heartbreak' Author Meghan Laslocky thought she had it bad when it came to love: she's been dumped 12 times. But then she discovered that Ernest Hemingway stole his wife's job when their marriage was collapsing. And that Lord Byron sent a breakup letter to his girlfriend, and had his new lover sign it. Laslocky joins us to talk about her new work "The Little Book of Heartbreak," and the history of lost love in movies, art and literature. What was your worst breakup? And how did you cope?
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered King Richard III, Exhumed From Beneath a Car Park DNA tests have confirmed that remains found beneath a UK parking lot are those of King Richard III, who ruled over England in the 15th century. Audie Cornish speaks with historian John Ashdown-Hill about who Richard III was in life and in literature.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Iran Targets Online Activists Since the brutal crackdown on dissent that followed Iran's 2009 elections, pro-democracy activists have taken their activities to the digital world. But with another election approaching in June, the authorities have aggressively stepped up their efforts to identify and target online activists inside the country, and make life difficult for those in exile. Analysts say the government is using sophisticated methods to shrink the online space for free expression, although it's a much tougher task than preventing or controlling street protests.
Monday, February 4, 2013

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