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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, January 29, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Immigration History As momentum grows for immigration reform, Audie Cornish takes a look back in time at another moment when the country was grappling with its immigrant population. In the early 1900s, the Dillingham Commission was mandated by Congress to undertake a massive study of immigrants. The program looks at the 1911 report with Senate Associate Historian Betty Koed. Its conclusions led the country to prioritize certain immigrants over others.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) The U.S. vs Iran: A Secret War For three decades, the United States and Iran have engaged in a secret war. It began with the Iranian revolution in 1979 and simmers today in Iraq and the Persian Gulf. The fighting takes place in the shadows, between the CIA and its network of spies and Iran's intelligence agency, and at sea, with Iranians in small speedboats attacking Western oil tankers. This conflict has frustrated five American presidents, divided administrations and repeatedly threatened to bring the two nations into open warfare. A senior historian for the federal government, David Crist spent more than 10 years researching and writing "The Twilight War," and he joins the show to discuss a number of important stories of military and intelligence operations by both sides, including successes, failures and their unexpected consequences.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Growth of China's Surveillance State There are more than 20 million public surveillance cameras in China. The government uses them to fight crime, but also to spy on dissidents. Agents say they monitor citizens through their cell phones as well.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Immigration Reform Takes Center Stage President Obama is set to make a major speech on immigration reform Tuesday, one day after a bipartisan group of senators released a plan to overhaul the nation's immigration policy. President Obama has called immigration the top legislative priority for his second term, and he's not the only one. Republicans are also focusing on reform after losing the Latino vote by a large margin in the last election. We speak with a panel of immigration experts about this week's events. What does the future hold for immigration policy?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Blind Soprano Laurie Rubin: Seeing Through Music When opera singer Laurie Rubin takes the stage, she stares straight into the audience -- even though she can't see a single person. Rubin has been blind since birth, and spent years being told she'd never live on her own or hold a real job. Today, the internationally acclaimed mezzo-soprano performs around the world. She also founded her own jewelry line and camp for young musicians. Rubin joins us to talk about her book, "Do You Dream in Color?" and about navigating the opera world as a blind, openly gay woman.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Plot to Change America's Way of War Guest host Dave Davies talks with journalist Fred Kaplan, author of the new book "The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War." It's about how the U.S. military came to embrace a counter-insurgency approach to fighting in Iraq -- and why that same approach failed in Afghanistan. Kaplan writes the "War Stories" column for Slate.
  • 2:00 pm
    World West Africa's Cocaine Connection West African nations are struggling with rebel groups and religious extremists. But there's another threat: narco-trafficking. Army officers connected to the South American drug trade are now running one West African country. An exile from Guinea Bissau says his nation needs outside help now.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Cheaper to Let it Sit Vacant homes tend to become eyesores. But the cost to demolish a house may be more than it's actually worth.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Chaos in Egypt -- Egypt's defense minister has warned that the country is on the brink of collapse amid continued rioting and clashes between police and protesters in several major cities. More than 50 people have died over the past four days, most of them in Port Said, at the northern end of the Suez Canal.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Cheaper to Let it Sit Vacant homes tend to become eyesores. But the cost to demolish a house may be more than it's actually worth.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Plot to Change America's Way of War Guest host Dave Davies talks with journalist Fred Kaplan, author of the new book "The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War." It's about how the U.S. military came to embrace a counter-insurgency approach to fighting in Iraq -- and why that same approach failed in Afghanistan. Kaplan writes the "War Stories" column for Slate.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Dave Eggers and Kevin Powers Kevin Powers joined the Army at the age of 17, later serving a year as a machine gunner in Mosul and Tal Afar, Iraq, in 2004 and 2005. After his honorable discharge he enrolled in Virginia Commonwealth University and later earned an M.F.A. from the University of Texas at Austin. His first novel, "The Yellow Birds," was nominated for a 2012 National Book Award. Called "brilliantly observed and deeply affecting" by The New York Times, the novel tells the story of a young soldier coming of age on the battlefield in Iraq. It is a story of loss of innocence, friendship, and the immeasurable cost of war. Powers appeared in conversation with author, McSweeney's founder and 826 Valencia co-founder Dave Eggers on January 16, 2013.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Dr. Robert Lustig's War on Sugar Dr. Robert Lustig is waging a war on sugar. He calls sugar the culprit behind obesity, and wants the government to regulate sugar the way it does alcohol. But his ideas have stirred up controversy among his medical colleagues who say he has insufficient evidence linking sugar to obesity. Dr. Lustig joins us to talk about his new book, "Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease."
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Drones in Africa The United States is looking to base surveillance drones in the African nation of Niger. The base there will allow U.S. unmanned vehicles to conduct operations in northern Africa, including in Mali, where France has intervened to fight Islamist militants. NPR's Tom Bowman talks to Melissa Block about the latest on the increasing U.S. military role in Africa.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered GITMO Office Closed The Obama administration has reassigned the State Department official who was in charge of closing Guantanamo. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports this confirms what people have known for a long time -- the prison is not shuttering any time soon.
Tuesday, January 29, 2013

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