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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, January 21, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, January 21, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Tech Nation Math Guy Keith Devlin Host Moira Gunn talks with Keith Devlin, NPR's math guy. He takes listeners back to 16th century Italy to Pisa and its leaning tower, in part to find out why we aren't using roman numerals.
  • 1:00 am
    Cambridge Forum Israel and the Palestinians: The Future of Diplomacy Canadian-Palestinian attorney and former adviser to Mahmoud Abbas Diana Buttu discusses the history of diplomatic peace overtures in the Middle East and the prospects for peaceful resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. What role has the United States played in negotiations? How has that role changed over time? How are Palestinian leaders using the United Nations and international law to further the peace process? What other forces can help promote a resolution of this long-running conflict?
  • 1:30 am
    Latino USA News Taco Editor Victor Landa The show speaks to News Taco Editor Victor Landa for a roundup on recent changes in U.S. politics, from Republicans regrouping in Florida to signs of hope for culturally relevant courses in Arizona schools.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Avoiding a Superstorm Sandy Lemon You may not have known it, but many of the 230,000 cars marinated in the flood waters of Hurricane Sandy are being bought and sold, often for salvage or to buyers who are looking for a deal. But some unscrupulous owners are engaging in what's called "title washing," altering a car's paperwork to disguise the damage, and then reselling to unwitting customers. The show goes shopping for tips on how to avoid a Hurricane Sandy lemon.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Second-Term Struggles? Barack Obama says he's aware that past presidents have struggled in their second terms. Presidential historian Michael Beschloss explains why.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    NPR News NPR News Special Presentation The Inauguration of President Barack Obama -- Steve Inskeep and Audie Cornish host special live coverage from the West front of the U.S. Capitol Building, where President Barack Obama's second inaugural ceremony will take place. They'll be joined by White House Correspondents Ari Shapiro and Scott Horsley.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday America at This Moment In a stately swirl of poetry, music, celebrity and cold, President Obama takes the oath of office and embarks on his second term. This Martin Luther King Day, the show takes the opportunity to reflect on where the country is now, and where it may be headed over the next four years.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Parsing the Inaugural Address In his first inaugural address, President Obama looked ahead to the challenges of unemployment, the collapse of the housing market and an economy in the throes of recession. The show parses President Obama's second inaugural address.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Struggle to Desegregate the Military For Martin Luther King Day, the show takes a look at the struggle for integration in the United States military, going back to the Revolutionary War. Dave Davies talks with Rawn James, author of the new book "The Double V: How Wars, Protest and Harry Truman Desegregated America's Military."
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace A Comeback for MLK's Hometown? Martin Luther King Jr.'s hometown -- the Sweet Auburn District in Atlanta, Georgia -- was once home to the richest corridor of African-Americans. After years of neglect, Sweet Auburn is preparing for a comeback.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace A Comeback for MLK's Hometown? Martin Luther King Jr.'s hometown -- the Sweet Auburn District in Atlanta, Georgia -- was once home to the richest corridor of African-Americans. After years of neglect, Sweet Auburn is preparing for a comeback.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Struggle to Desegregate the Military For Martin Luther King Day, the show takes a look at the struggle for integration in the United States military, going back to the Revolutionary War. Dave Davies talks with Rawn James, author of the new book "The Double V: How Wars, Protest and Harry Truman Desegregated America's Military."
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Humanitarian Aid to Syria: A U.S. Government Perspective Twenty months after the Assad regime began its brutal assault on its own people, the humanitarian situation is dire. Some 2.5 to 4 million people in Syria are in need of humanitarian assistance, approximately 1.2 to 2.5 million people are internally displaced and over half a million people have fled to Jordan, Turkey, Lebanon, Iraq and North Africa. Mark Bartolini will discuss the current humanitarian crisis in Syria, the U.S. government's humanitarian response efforts and the challenges of providing aid in the midst of ongoing violent conflict. He's the director of the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID).
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Deepak Chopra Are you using your brain to maximum advantage? In his new book "Super Brain," physician and prolific author Deepak Chopra posits that we are living in a golden age for brain research, which provides a roadmap for boosting productivity and happiness. Chopra joins us to discuss "Super Brain," co-authored with Harvard neurologist Rudolph Taniz. Chopra has written more than 65 books.
  • 11:00 pm
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Myanmar Spitfires Since the end of the World War II, a fantastic tale has lived on among veterans and aviation buffs. It says that British troops leaving Burma in 1945 buried dozens of Spitfire fighter planes in several locations around the country, also known as Myanmar. For the past 16 years, an English farmer has hunted the buried Spitfires. And now he believes he's close to unearthing them, and perhaps, restoring the fabled war planes to flying condition. Skeptics don't believe him and rival search teams are hoping he will fail.
Monday, January 21, 2013

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