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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, January 17, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, January 17, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Gun Manufacturers React Robert Siegel talks to Allen Youngman, executive director of the Defense Small Arms Advisory Council. He was in the meeting with Vice President Joe Biden and the National Rifle Association as the administration considered initiatives to reduce gun violence.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Massey Lectures It's been more than 40 years since Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, but his words still ring strong and his message still stirs. This special program features Dr. King's Massey lectures, which first aired in 1967 on the CBC Radio program "Ideas." His title was "Conscience for Change."
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Not Just Flu Season It's a nasty flu season -- but flu isn't the only contagious disease out there. There are plenty of other respiratory and intestinal infections, not to mention the common cold. The show explains how to tell these medical miseries apart.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Can Online Courses Ease California's Education Woes? Governor Jerry Brown says online college courses could help solve one of the problems facing the state's education system: overcrowded classrooms. The governor is fostering partnerships between online learning programs and higher education, including a newly inked deal between San Jose State University and the startup Udacity. Can low-cost online classes help keep education affordable? Can online classes maintain the quality of a university lecture?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Deepak Chopra Are you using your brain to maximum advantage? In his new book "Super Brain," physician and prolific author Deepak Chopra posits that we are living in a golden age for brain research, which provides a roadmap for boosting productivity and happiness. Chopra joins us to discuss "Super Brain," co-authored with Harvard neurologist Rudolph Taniz.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday What's Behind Rape? The world recoiled after brutal attacks on women in New Delhi and Steubenville, Ohio. As those stories continue to unfold, it's crucial to step back and figure out what we know about rape. Who carries out rapes? What happens to the victims? And why does this crime so often go uninvestigated?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday The Function of Dysfunction Many companies seem messy, with too many meetings that run too long, too many managers who make too much money and different goals for different departments. Now, two business analysts argue that dysfunction is the very thing that helps your organization get the job done. The show hears from the authors of "The Org: The Underlying Logic of the Office."
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air 'The Grayest Generation' As one of the growing number of women who waited until her late 30s to have her first child, Judith Shulevitz wonders if babies have a higher risk of developmental disorders if they're conceived by older parents and fertility treatments are involved. Terry Gross talks with Shulevitz about her recent article in the New Republic, "The Grayest Generation," which examines the research.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Saudi Women Gain Council Seats For the first time in Saudi Arabia, women have seats in the top legislative council. Some clerics complained. But the king decreed it -- and now it's law. The show talks with one of the new Saudi woman members about how the change happened.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Inaugural Bargains The crowds at the presidential inauguration this year aren't expected to be anywhere near as big as 2009, nor are the economic impacts. But that means bargains abound for those traveling to D.C.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Algeria Hostages Latest -- Today Algerian forces attacked the oil and gas facility being held by Islamist militants in the eastern part of Algeria. Reports are sketchy, but they indicate some hostages were freed and some were killed and some are still in the compound with their captors. Before the Algerian forces attacked, militants said they held about 40 hostages from a variety of countries. Reports say that some militants were also killed in the Algerian military operation.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Inaugural Bargains The crowds at the presidential inauguration this year aren't expected to be anywhere near as big as 2009, nor are the economic impacts. But that means bargains abound for those traveling to D.C.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air 'The Grayest Generation' As one of the growing number of women who waited until her late 30s to have her first child, Judith Shulevitz wonders if babies have a higher risk of developmental disorders if they're conceived by older parents and fertility treatments are involved. Terry Gross talks with Shulevitz about her recent article in the New Republic, "The Grayest Generation," which examines the research.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials East Jackson, Ohio - As Black As We Wish to Be The show visits a tiny town in the Appalachian foothills of Ohio where, for a century, residents have shared the common bond of identifying as African-American despite the fact that they look white. Racial lines have been blurred to invisibility, and people inside the same family can vehemently disagree about whether they are black or white. It can be tense and confusing. As a result, everyone's choosing: Am I black? Am I mixed race? Or, am I white? Adding to the confusion, there's a movement afoot to recognize their Native-American heritage.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Can Online Courses Ease California's Education Woes? Governor Jerry Brown says online college courses could help solve one of the problems facing the state's education system: overcrowded classrooms. The governor is fostering partnerships between online learning programs and higher education, including a newly inked deal between San Jose State University and the startup Udacity. Can low-cost online classes help keep education affordable? Can online classes maintain the quality of a university lecture?
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered France's Postcolonial Relationships Audie Cornish talks to Howard French, associate professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a former, longtime foreign correspondent for The New York Times, about the relationship between France and post-colonial Africa.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Climate Change and Early Spring Blooms Field journals from two of the country's most beloved naturalists -- Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold -- are helping modern scientists as they try to chart and predict the impact of climate change on the environment around us. They got some help last year when spring temperatures were the hottest on record. They were able to show that they can predict how even warmer temperatures will effect when the earliest plants start to bloom.
Thursday, January 17, 2013

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