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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, January 8, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, January 8, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered NASA Shuttle Facility Sale NASA is facing a conundrum of shuttle-sized proportions. Now that the shuttle program has ended, NASA is no longer using shuttle facilities and equipment. That includes everything from a launch pad to space in the building where rockets were assembled. So NASA is conducting a secret auction. What is NASA selling? And who might the buyers be?
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) U.S. Foreign Policy in 2013 and Beyond The election is finally over, so we can put all the posturing and heated campaign rhetoric behind us. What's ahead for foreign policy now that the presidency has been settled? What did we forget to talk about in the course of an election year that will now roar back onto the front pages, from China's new leadership to the advent of the cyber war era? The show's guest is Susan Glasser, editor-in-chief for Foreign Policy magazine. She will discuss what she expects will be on the foreign policy agenda in 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Math Teacher Drops Knowledge Algebra can be tough for any kid who's new to it. One high school math teacher has created an alter ego to help his students with concepts and formulas: 2 Pi, the math rapper.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum 'Zero Dark Thirty' Revives Torture Debate The new movie "Zero Dark Thirty," about the hunt and capture of Osama bin Laden, opened in some Bay Area theaters over the weekend. While the film has been widely praised by critics, it has come under fire for its depiction of torture and the role of "enhanced interrogation" in bin Laden's capture.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Philip Choy: A Guide to Chinatown Philip Choy grew up in San Francisco's Chinatown and went on to become an architect in the Bay Area. His new book "San Francisco Chinatown" reveals the culture and history of the district, and highlights landmarks like the distinctive YWCA Residence Club, designed by architect Julia Morgan, and Willie "Woo Woo" Wong Playground, named after a former USF basketball star. What's your favorite Chinatown building or historic site?
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday As Assad Rules Out Talks, What's Next? On Sunday, Syrian president Bashar al Assad made his first speech in six months. He called the factions fighting against his authoritarian regime "murderous criminals," and ruled out any chance of talks that could end the violence. The show discusses President Assad, his inner circle and his options.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air America's Second Revolution As a result of the Civil War, about one out of every three people in the south was suddenly freed from slavery. Historian Bruce Levine writes about why the Civil War was America's second revolution, and how it transformed the south and American politics, in his new book "The Fall of the House of Dixie."
  • 2:00 pm
    World Challenger Hopes to Push Israel Further Right Israeli elections are two weeks away. Benjamin Netanyahu is expected to win, but he's being challenged by his former chief of staff, a young rising star who's attracting lots of attention. Naftali Bennett is for settlements and against a Palestinian state -- and he wants to lead Israel further to the right.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Drones in Daily Life What if a remote-controlled aerial vehicle delivered your next pizza? The show looks at how drones could revolutionize our daily lives.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Tar Sands Oil Pollution Reaches Mountain Lakes -- Canada's tar sands oil production is polluting remote mountain lakes as much as 50 miles from the operations. This pollution is reaching the level of urban lakes. But it's not yet at toxic levels. The new finding comes from research by Canadian academic and government scientists. It's not the gloomy picture painted by environmentalists nor is it the rosy one industry has been claiming.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Drones in Daily Life What if a remote-controlled aerial vehicle delivered your next pizza? The show looks at how drones could revolutionize our daily lives.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air America's Second Revolution As a result of the Civil War, about one out of every three people in the south was suddenly freed from slavery. Historian Bruce Levine writes about why the Civil War was America's second revolution, and how it transformed the south and American politics, in his new book "The Fall of the House of Dixie."
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Malcolm Gladwell & Adam Gopnik The author of four books and numerous New Yorker articles, Malcolm Gladwell brings astute observations and graceful prose to contemporary issues of sociology, psychology and culture. His books "The Tipping Point," "Blink" and "Outliers" all deal with human behavior and its cultural implications. Adam Gopnik has been writing for The New Yorker since 1986. His background in art history and broad and sophisticated perspective on culture make him a frequent and popular voice on many subjects. He has written fiction and humor pieces, book reviews, profiles, reporting pieces, and more than a hundred stories for "The Talk of the Town" and "Comment." His books, ranging from essay collections about Paris and food to children's novels, include "Paris to the Moon," "Angels and Ages: A Short Book About Darwin" and "Lincoln." Gladwell and Gopnik appeared in conversation on November 19, 2012.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum 'Zero Dark Thirty' Revives Torture Debate The new movie "Zero Dark Thirty," about the hunt and capture of Osama bin Laden, opened in some Bay Area theaters over the weekend. While the film has been widely praised by critics, it has come under fire for its depiction of torture and the role of "enhanced interrogation" in bin Laden's capture.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered 2012: Hottest Year on Record It's official: 2012 was the hottest year on record for the contiguous United States. In fact, it shattered the record set in 1998. The National Climatic Data Center says last year was also extraordinarily dry -- and drought conditions are persisting into 2013.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Farm Reform Fails Last year, a loose alliance of environmentalists, economists and critics of industrial agriculture pushed -- once again -- for fundamental changes in U.S. farm subsidies. They failed. Even minimal reforms got discarded by Congressional leaders in the rush to resolve the government's fiscal crisis. But some reformers are cheered by the fact that farm lobbyists also failed to get what they wanted -- a generous new Farm Bill.
Tuesday, January 8, 2013

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