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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, January 4, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, January 4, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Student Hunger During the Holidays Taking a break for the holidays is something most students love. But for some, being home means being hungry. Millions of students in the U.S. get free or reduced price meals at school. So when school is out, they eat less.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Climate One James Hansen 'Storms of My Grandchildren' -- NASA climatologist James Hansen has grown increasingly concerned about the risks of climatic tipping points which could bring catastrophic consequences. His recent research identifies human fingerprints on specific instances of extreme weather such as Superstorm Sandy, putting him out in front of many of his peers. In 1989, Dr. Hansen was the first person to testify before Congress about global warming. Currently the world's preeminent climate scientist, James Hansen is head of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, adjunct professor at Columbia University's Earth Institute and author of "Storms of My Grandchildren."
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition How Accurate is 'Promised Land'? A new movie about fracking has angered the oil and gas industry. It shows them making big promises to profit off of desperate folks. But how accurate is it? The show gets a reality check of "Promised Land."
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List Suzie Racho and Peter Hartlaub scout the Bay Area for things to do this coming weekend, and come up with a band paying tribute to Ray Charles, a celebration of paper, an Oakland garage rock trio and much more.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Al Jazeera Buys Current TV Al Jazeera has bought San Francisco-based Current TV for $500 million. Owned by the government of Qatar, Al Jazeera hopes to expand its U.S. audience. The deal could potentially give the news network access to 50 million new homes. We discuss the history, ambitions and future of Al Jazeera and its potential impact on journalism in the U.S. The network has won many prestigious journalism awards, but some critics say it has an anti-American bias.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum 'The Freelancer's Bible' Are you one of nearly 9 million self-employed Americans? Are you a freelancer and find your own clients? Or do you have a full or part-time job to pay the bills, and a gig you love on the side? Sara Horowitz is the founder of the Freelancers Union, which has 170,000 members nationwide, from writers to web designers to nannies. She joins us to discuss her new book, "The Freelancer's Bible," the pros and cons of life as an independent worker and tips for success in today's economy.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday The Year in Science What were the top science stories of 2012? The year brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, private flights to the International Space Station and a farewell to the Galapagos tortoise Lonesome George. Host Ira Flatow and guests look back at the year 2012 in science.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday How Do Cold-Dwellers Survive? How do Arctic fish avoid becoming ice cubes? It turns out they have something like antifreeze in their blood. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the weird adaptations of cold-dwellers. Plus, the show takes a trip to the icy clouds where comets are born.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Dad the Mob Hit Man Frank Calabrese Jr. talks about his father Frank Calabrese, a Chicago mob hit man who died in prison on Christmas Day at the age of 75. Calabrese Jr. wore a wire against his father and wrote about him in a memoir. The show also listens back to a 1995 interview with Fontella Bass, the singer of the 1965 hit "Rescue Me." She died last week.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Living Undocumented, in Mexico Millions of children are born in Mexico without getting a birth certificate. These unregistered kids cannot go to school, and as far as the government is concerned, they remain invisible for a lifetime. But one man is helping Mexico's undocumented people to attain the rights of citizenship, and dignity.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Durability a Tough Target for Gunmakers Guns are one of the most durable of durable goods. But keeping it that way is becoming quite a challenge for gun manufacturers.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine An array of new education bills become law in California this month. Several are designed to tackle one of the state's most alarming issues: the skyrocketing rate of student suspensions. California schools are now issuing more suspensions than diplomas, particularly to African-American students. Nowhere is that more apparent than in the Oakland Unified School District. But district officials hope a new approach called Restorative Justice will turn things around.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    House Passes Sandy Aid -- The U.S. House approved more than $9 billion in flood insurance funding to help victims of Superstorm Sandy on Friday. The money initially got caught up in the fiscal cliff drama, and the bill was never considered. As NPR's Tamara Keith reports, House Speaker John Boehner promised to New York and New Jersey delegations to make it right.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine An array of new education bills become law in California this month. Several are designed to tackle one of the state's most alarming issues: the skyrocketing rate of student suspensions. California schools are now issuing more suspensions than diplomas, particularly to African-American students. Nowhere is that more apparent than in the Oakland Unified School District. But district officials hope a new approach called Restorative Justice will turn things around.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Dad the Mob Hit Man Frank Calabrese Jr. talks about his father Frank Calabrese, a Chicago mob hit man who died in prison on Christmas Day at the age of 75. Calabrese Jr. wore a wire against his father and wrote about him in a memoir. The show also listens back to a 1995 interview with Fontella Bass, the singer of the 1965 hit "Rescue Me." She died last week.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Skulls: A Tale of the World's Most Bizarre Collection The program's guest is Simon Winchester, renowned writer and raconteur whose books on the 1906 earthquake, Krakatoa and the Oxford English Dictionary captivated readers worldwide. He now presents a spellbinding exploration of an obsessive collector of what some may call the macabre: more than 300 animal skulls, including amphibians, birds, fish, mammals and reptiles. Winchester writes: "Skulls have exerted for scores of thousands of years an almost inexplicable power over the human imagination. They are symbols both of existence and of former existence; they are freighted with terror and awe; they tell of life, death, and the afterlife, of good and evil, of danger, authority and majesty."
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum 'The Freelancer's Bible' Are you one of nearly 9 million self-employed Americans? Are you a freelancer and find your own clients? Or do you have a full or part-time job to pay the bills, and a gig you love on the side? Sara Horowitz is the founder of the Freelancers Union, which has 170,000 members nationwide, from writers to web designers to nannies. She joins us to discuss her new book, "The Freelancer's Bible," the pros and cons of life as an independent worker and tips for success in today's economy.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine An array of new education bills become law in California this month. Several are designed to tackle one of the state's most alarming issues: the skyrocketing rate of student suspensions. California schools are now issuing more suspensions than diplomas, particularly to African-American students. Nowhere is that more apparent than in the Oakland Unified School District. But district officials hope a new approach called Restorative Justice will turn things around.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered Mystery of the Disappearing Deer Scientists throughout the West are trying to figure out the mystery of the disappearing mule deer. Since the 1970s, biologists in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah have seen deer populations drop by 50 percent. The potential causes vary. Oil and gas development and the growth in coyote populations top the list.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Planning for Venezuela After Chavez Venezuelan officials say their president Hugo Chavez remains in a "delicate" condition in a Havana hospital following his fourth cancer surgery. If Chavez cannot be sworn in to a new presidential term on January 10, a process of selecting a new president will begin. How well-prepared is the U.S. government for a post-Chavez Venezuela?
Friday, January 4, 2013

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