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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, December 20, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, December 20, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Trauma and First Responders First responders are trained to rescue, help and save. In Newtown, Conn., many of the police officers, firefighters and EMTs who responded to Sandy Hook Elementary School after last week's shootings are struggling to cope with the fact that there was little they could do. Counselors have been meeting with Sandy Hook's first responders since Friday. Experts say the trauma of an event can stay with first responders long after funerals conclude and TV lights and cameras go home.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials TED Radio Hour Building a Better Classroom -- We know getting a good education is important, but does the current model nurture real learning? Three TED speakers share powerful ideas about how to change education for the better. Teachers are flipping classrooms, rethinking lesson plans and re-imagining the role of teacher and student, learner and educator.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Why the World Won't End Tomorrow Some people are worried about an ancient Mayan calendar's prediction for December 21st. A Maya scholar says they shouldn't be. He says the Maya never predicted any kind of doomsday.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Doomsday Predictions and the Mayan Calendar This Friday, December 21, is when the Mayan calendar appears to wrap up its most recent long-count cycle of 5,125 years. It's also a day some believe will bring the end of the world. They predict a rogue planet will collide with Earth, or that other planets will align and cause a giant blackout. But NASA experts say there's nothing on the horizon, and that the doomsday theory is a misreading of the Mayan calendar. Still others believe the world will undergo a spiritual, not physical, transformation. Why is the idea of an apocalypse so popular?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Ray Kurzweil On Monday, futurist and visionary inventor Ray Kurzweil joined Google as its new director of engineering, to work on projects related to machine learning and language processing. We'll talk to Kurzweil about his new position and his latest book, "How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed."
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Security Risks in 2030 The list of current National Security threats might include terrorist cells, embassy attacks and espionage. But looking ahead to the year 2030, the U.S. intelligence community warns that climate change will drive conflict, migration and instability. And the growth of the middle class will step up competition for resources.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Holiday Concert With Ensemble Galilei The show celebrates the season with Ensemble Galilei, an eclectic group that performs music from the Renaissance, from Ireland, Scotland and Sweden.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Battle to End Gun Violence Terry Gross talks with Tom Diaz, a former NRA member and competitive shooter who became a gun control lobbyist with The Violence Policy Center in Washington, D.C. He'll discuss the uphill battle to enact stricter gun control laws in the U.S.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Obsessive Worlds of Otaku In Japan, obsessive collectors of comic books and anime have a name: otaku. Their lifelong devotion to their collections can result in some startling life changes. The show learns more about otaku, and the fictional worlds they inhabit.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace When Debtors Get Out of Prison When people are released from prison, usually they still owe money to the courts and the victims. Now, one state is going to start fining those that miss their court dates.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Benghazi Hearings -- The U.S. head of diplomatic security has resigned and three other State Department officials have been relieved of their duties after a review board issued a scathing report about the attack that killed the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans in September. The report did not touch Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's role in the event. She's been ill and had her deputies go to Congress today to speak about Benghazi. But, she's promising members of Congress she will address it when she's better, in January.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace When Debtors Get Out of Prison When people are released from prison, usually they still owe money to the courts and the victims. Now, one state is going to start fining those that miss their court dates.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Battle to End Gun Violence Terry Gross talks with Tom Diaz, a former NRA member and competitive shooter who became a gun control lobbyist with The Violence Policy Center in Washington, D.C. He'll discuss the uphill battle to enact stricter gun control laws in the U.S.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Tinsel Tales Two with Lynn Neary NPR fills millions of homes each holiday with humor, warmth and a host of festive voices. Continuing with the tradition of the first Tinsel Tales program, the show features a collection of the best and most-requested holiday stories. Joy, hope and childhood memories overflow as NPR voices -- past and present -- tell stories of the season.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Ray Kurzweil On Monday, futurist and visionary inventor Ray Kurzweil joined Google as its new director of engineering, to work on projects related to machine learning and language processing. We'll talk to Kurzweil about his new position and his latest book, "How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed."
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Gun Control Poll Public opinion on the importance of gun control has shown a shift since the deadly shooting at a Connecticut elementary school. But it's not a big shift. A new poll by the Pew Research Center found that Americans think controlling gun ownership is more important than protecting gun rights by a margin of 49 to 42 percent. Back in the summer, it was a much narrower divide -- only a single percentage point separation. Andy Kohut, president of the Pew Research Center, talks with Melissa Block about the findings.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Strange Chicago Jailbreak Two convicted bank robbers escaped from a jail in downtown Chicago earlier this week. Authorities think they did it by breaking through a window and climbing down a rope of bed sheets before hailing a cab to get away. The cellmates are still on the run.
Thursday, December 20, 2012

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