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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, December 18, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered After Another Florida Shooting, Should 'Stand Your Ground' Remain? Michael Dunn, the man charged with shooting and killing 17-year-old Justin Davis in a dispute over loud music, was arraigned Monday on first-degree murder charges. He has claimed he acted in self-defense -- and Florida's Stand Your Ground law may be an issue as it has been in the Trayvon Martin shooting. Davis' father is calling for changes in Florida's gun laws.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Ending the Hunger Cycle in Africa The idea of a "hungry farmer" should be an oxymoron. However among smallholder farmers in Africa for whom agricultural practices have not changed since the 1930's, most do not produce enough to feed their families. Consequently every year they face what in Kenya is known as the wanjala -- the hunger season -- between when food from the previous harvest has run out and the next one is ready. Join Roger Thurow for an exploration of the year he spent following four farming families in Western Kenya as they tried to dramatically change their farming techniques in an attempt to increase their harvest, and the challenges facing individual farmers striving to increase food production, as well as the macro-problems facing our global food supply chain. Roger Thurow is Fellow for Global Agriculture and Food Policy with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Morning Edition The Latest From Newtown As the funerals begin for the victims of the Newtown school shootings, the investigation continues. The program will feature the latest on the aftermath of the tragedy, as well as analysis of how it might affect national gun policy.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Violent Media and Mass Shootings As the country grapples for answers in the aftermath of the Newtown massacre, some are pointing to violence in the media as a potential culprit. Do violent movies, TV shows and video games promote aggressive behavior in youth? We look at the latest research.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum In Afghanistan, 'Games Without Rules' The history of Afghanistan is often understood in terms of invasions. The area has been occupied by the likes of Alexander the Great and Genghis Khan, and, more recently, the Soviet Union and the U.S.-led NATO coalition. But the country has its own compelling story independent of the interventions, writes San Francisco-based author Tamim Ansary. The Kabul native joins us to discuss his new book, "Games Without Rules: The Often Interrupted History of Afghanistan."
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday How Desperate is Assad? The head of NATO says the Assad regime is close to collapse. Even Russia seems ready to concede that Bashar al-Assad's government may not survive the civil war. Amid reports that SCUD missiles have been fired, and a Syrian government warning that rebels could get their hands on chemical weapons, how desperate is Damascus?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Witness to Tragedy Earlier this year, 12 people were killed and dozens more injured in a shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado. Dominic Bivins, who was in the theater next door, said "there was all kinds of screaming. It was just terrible." From Columbine to Newtown, the lives of those who bear witness can change forever.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Christoph Waltz on 'Django Unchained' German-Austrian actor Christoph Waltz talks about starring in the new Quentin Tarantino film "Django Unchained." Waltz won an Oscar as well as a Golden Globe, BAFTA and SAG award for his portrayal of the Nazi SS officer Hans Landa in Tarantino's previous film "Inglourious Basterds."
  • 2:00 pm
    World Free Trade and the American Car The show reports on a Michigan town that lost much of its auto industry, and on a Mexican town where American cars are now made. The jobs moved south, but not the prosperity.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Labor in Michigan: A History Sometimes to understand the present, you've got to study the past. With that in mind, the show looks into the history behind how Michigan became a right-to-work state.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Labor in Michigan: A History Sometimes to understand the present, you've got to study the past. With that in mind, the show looks into the history behind how Michigan became a right-to-work state.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Christoph Waltz on 'Django Unchained' German-Austrian actor Christoph Waltz talks about starring in the new Quentin Tarantino film "Django Unchained." Waltz won an Oscar as well as a Golden Globe, BAFTA and SAG award for his portrayal of the Nazi SS officer Hans Landa in Tarantino's previous film "Inglourious Basterds."
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Cheryl Strayed Cheryl Strayed is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir "Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail." After the sudden death of her mother when Strayed was in her early twenties, her world fell apart. "I was living alone in a studio apartment in Minneapolis, separated from my husband and working as a waitress, as low and mixed-up as I'd ever been," she writes. Desperate to escape her situation and find what she calls "radical aloneness," Strayed set out in the summer of 1995 at the age of 26 to hike from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State. What she found was an ability to navigate not only the dangerous physical challenges of the Pacific Crest Trail, but the world. Strayed is also the author of the novel "Torch." Her stories and essays have appeared in numerous magazines and journals, including The New York Times Magazine, Allure, Self and The Sun. Her book "Tiny Beautiful Things" is a compilation of her "Dear Sugar" advice columns for The Rumpus.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered South Korea's First Woman President? The final polls ahead of South Korea's presidential election show Park Geun-hye with a narrow lead over her opponent. She's poised to be the first female leader of a country where, until quite recently, men monopolized politics. But feminists say Park, the daughter of a former authoritarian leader Park Chung-hee, is not one of them. Her policies, they say, are no more beneficial for women than those of her opponent. And while they would welcome a female leader, they predict it would do little to change South Korea.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Instagram Backlash The Facebook-owned photo sharing site Instagram now says it has the right to sell user photos to advertisers without their notification or approval. It's a change in the company's privacy policy. Instagram was acquired by Facebook in April. NPR's Steve Henn says the new advertising approach is likely to face problems -- from customer backlash to legal challenges.
Tuesday, December 18, 2012

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