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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, December 14, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, December 14, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Planet Money Dominance of LEGOS LEGO blocks are wildly popular with children all over the world. And their market dominance poses an economic mystery -- why haven't other companies figured out how to make plastic blocks and undercut the high prices of LEGO? For years, competitors have had trouble catching up with LEGO. Planet Money tells us the story of why one simple toy never loses.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Intelligence Squared U.S. Does Science Refute God? -- On the fundamental question of evolution or creation -- Americans are on the fence. According to one survey, while 61 percent of Americans believe we have evolved over time, 22 percent believe this evolution was guided by a higher power, with another 31 percent on the side of creationism. For some, modern science debunks many of religion's core beliefs. But for others, questions like "Why are we here?" and "How did it all come about?" can only be answered through a belief in the existence of God. Can science and religion co-exist?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Laura Linney Actress Laura Linney discusses her new movie "Hyde Park on the Hudson," the story of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's secret romance with a distant cousin.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we've got a seven-string guitarist, art based on Islamic tradition, the battle between Christmas and Hanukkah and much more!
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Delaying Parenthood It's a demographic change that is easy to spot at preschool pick-ups or at playgrounds: More people are having kids when they're older. Nationally about 14 percent of babies are born to women over the age of 35. Those babies tend to grow up in wealthier and more educated households. But medical risks are higher for babies of older parents, and kids may have to deal with a parent's death at a younger age. We discuss the societal benefits and drawbacks of older parenthood.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum 'Masters of Disaster' If you're a New York governor who solicits call girls, or a Congressman who accidentally tweets a salacious photo to someone who isn't his wife, you might need help with damage control. That's what consultants Mark Fabiani and Christopher LeHane offer in their new book, "Masters of Disaster," which refers to the nickname they earned while serving as aides to the Clinton White House during the Whitewater and Monica Lewinsky years. Fabiani and LeHane discuss the secrets of political spin in politics, business and Hollywood.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday The Nature of the Human Brain What does it mean to think? To be intelligent? Join Science Friday for a conversation with Ray Kurzweil about the nature of the human brain. Can we build a mind? Plus, get into the holiday spirit with some Christmas tree science. And actor Alan Alda is challenging scientists to answer: What is time?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Ask a Quantum Mechanic Could a quantum internet someday teleport your emails? Join Science Friday for that and other quantum questions. It's "ask a quantum mechanic." Plus, the Land of Polaroid: How those instant snapshots changed the way we picture our world.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Remembering Ravi Shankar Fresh Air remembers sitarist Ravi Shankar who died Tuesday at the age of 92, and listen back to our 1999 interview with him. Then the show features an interview with Randy Newman. It was just announced that he'll be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame next year.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Mayan Calendar and China The world ends Friday the twenty-first according to one interpretation of the Mayan calendar. That rumor is especially widespread in China, where many people are hoping for the best, but preparing for the end.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace How Michigan Became A Right-to-Work State Sometimes to understand the present, you've got to study the past. The show looks at understanding the history behind how Michigan became a right-to-work state.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine Our music reviewers share their picks for the year's best "under-the-radar" music. Plus, poet Al Young talks about writing his monthly poem about California this year and reads his December piece.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    CT School Shooting -- The latest on the elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine Our music reviewers share their picks for the year's best "under-the-radar" music. Plus, poet Al Young talks about writing his monthly poem about California this year and reads his December piece.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Remembering Ravi Shankar Fresh Air remembers sitarist Ravi Shankar who died Tuesday at the age of 92, and listen back to our 1999 interview with him. Then the show features an interview with Randy Newman. It was just announced that he'll be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame next year.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Carbon Math Energy companies have five times as much oil and coal and gas on their books than climate scientists think is safe to burn. That was the takeaway from Bill McKibben's recent Rolling Stone article on "Global Warming's Terrifying New Math." McKibben says it is his single most important work since his first book "The End of Nature" nearly 30 years ago. Now the activist is launching a "Do the Math" campaign around the country to galvanize support for stronger action to reduce carbon pollution. John Hofmeister says environmental measures driven too quickly will only backfire as the inconvenience or cost meets grass roots resistance. Time is an ally, he says, and enhances our ability to adapt to change, and energy companies are not monoliths and can be part of the solution. Bill McKibben is founder of 350.org and author of "Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet." John Hofmeister is CEO for Citizens for Affordable Energy and a former president of Shell Oil Company.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Delaying Parenthood It's a demographic change that is easy to spot at preschool pick-ups or at playgrounds: More people are having kids when they're older. Nationally about 14 percent of babies are born to women over the age of 35. Those babies tend to grow up in wealthier and more educated households. But medical risks are higher for babies of older parents, and kids may have to deal with a parent's death at a younger age. We discuss the societal benefits and drawbacks of older parenthood.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine Our music reviewers share their picks for the year's best "under-the-radar" music. Plus, poet Al Young talks about writing his monthly poem about California this year and reads his December piece.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered Shooter Profile Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish have the latest on the suspected shooter in elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Gay Mormon Chorus Mormons are known the world over for their Tabernacle Choir. Now a group of Latter Day Saints in Utah is forming a new chorus for gays and lesbians. It's called the One Voice Choir. Organizers say the singers will promote mutual understanding and share the message of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. But One Voice has had some trouble getting rehearsal space in LDS churches. The group's first holiday concert takes places this weekend.
Friday, December 14, 2012

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