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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, December 12, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, December 12, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Syrian Doctors Get Trauma Training Some physicians are offering trauma training classes for Syrian doctors working in field clinics and hospitals. The trainers, two doctors from the Mayo clinic, demonstrate the basics -- like how best to set a leg with no anesthetics, or how to repair a torn artery. The Syrian doctors cross back into their country with better skills and some equipment.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Tom Wolfe Tom Wolfe is the author of more than a dozen books, among them such contemporary classics as "The Right Stuff," "The Bonfire of the Vanities" and "A Man in Full." Credited with inventing New Journalism, whereby writers acknowledge their own subjectivity and oftentimes employ literary techniques to reporting, Wolfe spent his early career in newspapers, mostly as a general assignment reporter but also a foreign correspondent. While still a reporter, he completed his first book, a collection of articles about the flamboyant '60s written for New York Magazine and Esquire, thus cementing his reputation as a noted chronicler and staunch critic of contemporary culture. Set in Miami, his newest book "Back to Blood" features Wolfe's high-energy reporting and a cast of characters as fascinating as any he has ever conceived. Wolfe appeared in conversation with Steven Winn on November 1, 2012.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Future of Russia's Military Russia's fierce military is the stuff of legend. But lately, not so much. Its weapons are out of date -- and Russia's birth rate has dropped, so there aren't enough soldiers.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Muni Turns 100 Muni, San Francisco's transit agency, was launched 100 years ago this month. It was the first publicly owned transit system in a major city in the U.S. The inaugural line ran on Geary Street between downtown and 33rd Avenue. Now, Muni has about 700,000 daily boardings and runs 63 bus routes, seven light rail lines, a historic streetcar line and three cable car lines. Muni has been transporting -- and frustrating -- customers throughout the century. We discuss the history and current state of Muni.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum The Art and Fire of Flamenco Raised by a flamenco dancer, Yaelisa has been dancing onstage since she was four years old. The Emmy Award-winning choreographer went on to start her own local dance company, Caminos Flamencos, where she incorporates her training from Spain with other multinational influences. Yaelisa and her husband, flamenco guitarist Jason McGuire (aka "El Rubio"), perform in our studios.
  • 10:30 am
    Forum Rupa & The April Fishes Rupa Marya is a San Francisco doctor. But at night, she swaps her stethoscope for a guitar. She's the lead singer of Rupa & The April Fishes, a multicultural band that sings in English, French, Spanish and Hindi. Marya joins us to play a couple songs with her band, and to talk about her international influences and what shaped the band's latest album, "Build."
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Political Junkie The 2012 election concludes in Louisiana. DeMint's departure sets up a three-ring circus in South Carolina with both Senate seats and the statehouse up in 2014. And, as the president prepares to reshuffle his cabinet, speculation swirls about 2016 and Hillary Clinton's plans. Ken Rudin joins host Neal Conan.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Flu Season Starts Early The flu arrived especially early this year, and it's a particularly tough strain. Even so, doctors say this year's vaccine is well designed and more people are getting it. CDC Director Tom Frieden joins host Neal Conan to answer listeners' flu questions.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Kennedy 'Patriarch' Joseph P. Kennedy was a multimillionaire at the age of 40, a movie mogul, an ambassador and most importantly the head of one of America's greatest political dynasties. Dave Davies talks with Kennedy's biographer David Nasaw about his new book, "The Patriarch."
  • 2:00 pm
    World All-Muslim TV in Russia Russian authorities fear Islamic extremism. So they're providing an alternate view of Islam, with a nationwide Islamic TV channel. The focus is on fun and culture, not fundamentalism or religion. The goal is to inform, entertain and unite Russia's ethnic Muslim communities.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Value of Gift-Buying In the next installment of Freakonomics Radio, economists weigh in on the value of buying gifts for others (that they may or may not like) versus just buying gifts for ourselves.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    L.A. Schools and Deferred Action -- If you came to the U.S. illegally as a child or teen and can produce your high school transcript, you could be eligible for the program for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) process. But getting that transcript can be burdensome, since tens of thousands of requests have been made. The Los Angeles Public School system has gotten the biggest number of DACA application requests.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Value of Gift-Buying In the next installment of Freakonomics Radio, economists weigh in on the value of buying gifts for others (that they may or may not like) versus just buying gifts for ourselves.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Kennedy 'Patriarch' Joseph P. Kennedy was a multimillionaire at the age of 40, a movie mogul, an ambassador and most importantly the head of one of America's greatest political dynasties. Dave Davies talks with Kennedy's biographer David Nasaw about his new book, "The Patriarch."
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials State of the Re:Union with Al Letson Internet Communities - Making the Virtual Real -- At this point in the 21st century, the way we meet people, establish connections, maintain our relationships and fight for what we believe in has been radically transformed by the Internet. But often, when we're talking about these changes, the focus is either on pure enthusiasm about the limitless possibilities presented by the Web, or anxiety about online connections replacing physical ones. The show features stories of the Internet's impact on community-building in human terms, on the messy level of people's daily existence, where its effects are rarely solely positive or negative. These are stories of wholesale life transformations facilitated by the Internet and of the ways the "virtual" has turned into the "real" in people's lives.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum The Art and Fire of Flamenco Raised by a flamenco dancer, Yaelisa has been dancing onstage since she was four years old. The Emmy Award-winning choreographer went on to start her own local dance company, Caminos Flamencos, where she incorporates her training from Spain with other multinational influences. Yaelisa and her husband, flamenco guitarist Jason McGuire (aka "El Rubio"), perform in our studios.
  • 10:30 pm
    Forum Rupa & The April Fishes Rupa Marya is a San Francisco doctor. But at night, she swaps her stethoscope for a guitar. She's the lead singer of Rupa & The April Fishes, a multicultural band that sings in English, French, Spanish and Hindi. Marya joins us to play a couple songs with her band, and to talk about her international influences and what shaped the band's latest album, "Build."
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Holiday Fruitcake Capitol Claxton, in southeast Georgia, claims the title "fruitcake capital of the world." Two bakeries there make and ship fruitcakes across the country. They hate being the butt of jokes about their fruit and nut treat, and people never got over Johnny Carson's annual rant that the fruitcake is the worst gift. "There's only one fruitcake in the entire world," Carson said, "and people keep sending it to each other." Tourists help support the small town's economy and of course, the sale of fruitcakes which are now sold on QVC.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Easing Restrictions on Community Radio The Federal Communications Commission recently passed rules that will mean more community groups across the nation can apply to be on FM airwaves in the coming year. The changes are lauded by those who say more diverse and local voices belong on the radio -- especially in urban settings where issues important to the community are often absent in mainstream media. In Springfield, Ill., Mbanna Kantako has been broadcasting illegally for 25 years. He's a pioneer of a movement that led to the pirating of radio channels across the nation. Experts say it was this movement that led to changes in the way small stations will be licensed by the FCC.
Wednesday, December 12, 2012

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