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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, December 4, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered U.S. Provides Aid to Syrians in Rebel-Held Areas The administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development made a high-profile visit to the Syrian refugee camps in Turkey last week. The U.S. has made a very big show of its support for the Syrian opposition after the November presidential election. Inside Syrian border towns, diplomatic cars have also been spotted as the West looks for some influence with those who are already ruling northern Syria.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Renewing America The program's guest is Gus Speth, professor at Vermont Law School and senior fellow in the United Nations Foundation. The past few years have shown that America is facing hard times with complex challenges still ahead. The unemployment rate hovers around 8 percent, the income inequality gap continues to widen and American students are not receiving the best education possible. To add to this, the country is in the midst of political gridlock. To surmount these difficulties, Speth asserts that transformative change is essential in the American political economy. Speth will discuss his ideas for the specific adjustments that would be needed to move toward a new system, such as the "theory of change" that explains how system change can occur in America.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Music Inspired by a Little Red Guitar When two musicians found a cheap red electric guitar on the Internet, they shipped it to 60 other musicians around the world, from rock stars and experimental composers to unknowns.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Asperger's Syndrome Removed as Official Diagnosis The American Psychiatric Association voted this weekend to remove the diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome from the so-called bible of psychiatry, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders. People with Asperger's will now more likely be diagnosed as having autism spectrum disorder. The APA says the change will lead to more accurate diagnoses for people with autism -- but critics say removing the diagnosis may result in fewer people getting the services and care they need.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum 'At the Fights' Howard Schatz photographs a lot of beautiful people, from ballerinas jumping midair to women swimming gracefully underwater. But his newest book "At the Fights" gets up close and gritty with the bruising world of professional boxing. Schatz photographs boxers' muscled bodies at their athletic best. But he also goes behind the flashy showmanship by taking before-and-after fight photos.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Joe Lieberman: An Exit Interview Neal Conan talks with Joe Lieberman, who has served more than two decades in the U.S. Senate. He became the vice presidential nominee of the Democratic Party in 2000, and very nearly the Republican VP nominee in 2008. He has said he didn't leave the Democratic Party so much as the party left him.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air 'Inventing Wine' Wine dates back 8,000 years. But ancient wine was quite different than the drink we know today. For one thing, it tasted pretty bad -- so bad that people would add things like lead, pine resin and marble dust to improve the taste. Terry Gross talks with wine writer and historian Paul Lukacs about his new book "Inventing Wine."
  • 2:00 pm
    World Battling Cancer in Haiti Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the developing world. In Haiti, having breast cancer is often seen as a death sentence. But some American doctors are working to change that. Health correspondent Joanne Silberner follows doctors in Haiti, one of cancer's new battlegrounds.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Robots in Agriculture? How many strawberries do you think the Jetsons' Rosie could pick in an hour? The show looks at how robots could be the next big thing in agriculture.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm & 6pm


    Syria's Chemical Weapons -- President Obama has warned the Syrian government not to use chemical weapons against its own people or face serious consequences. The new warning comes after the U.S. apparently detected activity at Syrian chemical weapons sites. Tom Bowman talks to Melissa Block about Syria's program and what the U.S. options might be.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Robots in Agriculture? How many strawberries do you think the Jetsons' Rosie could pick in an hour? The show looks at how robots could be the next big thing in agriculture.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air 'Inventing Wine' Wine dates back 8,000 years. But ancient wine was quite different than the drink we know today. For one thing, it tasted pretty bad -- so bad that people would add things like lead, pine resin and marble dust to improve the taste. Terry Gross talks with wine writer and historian Paul Lukacs about his new book "Inventing Wine."
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Life After Murder The program presents an evening investigating murder, social justice and the concept of redemption. Award-winning journalist Nancy Mullane and former San Quentin inmates and murderers will offer a glimpse into the lives of convicted killers who have done their time and are now struggling to live on the outside again. Mullane's book "Life After Murder" follows five convicted murderers sentenced to life with the possibility of parole in their struggle for redemption, their legal battles to make good on the state's promise of parole and the lives they encounter after so many years inside. Can a murderer be redeemed? Who do they become after serving decades in prison? What does it take for a killer to be accepted back into society?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Asperger's Syndrome Removed as Official Diagnosis The American Psychiatric Association voted this weekend to remove the diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome from the so-called bible of psychiatry, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders. People with Asperger's will now more likely be diagnosed as having autism spectrum disorder. The APA says the change will lead to more accurate diagnoses for people with autism -- but critics say removing the diagnosis may result in fewer people getting the services and care they need.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered In Minot, More Jobs Than Takers The home-improvement retailer Menards is having such a hard time finding workers for its store in Minot, North Dakota, that it is importing them from Wisconsin. The area around Minot is experiencing an oil boom and a population boom with more jobs than takers. So to help fill the open positions at Menards, the company is looking to hire 50 workers from the company's headquarters in Eau Claire, Wisc., to work in Minot.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Electronic Medical Records A significant number of doctors are unhappy with their new electronic medical records systems, paid for in large part by federal stimulus funds. Federal officials, in turn, are worried that the digital efficiency is actually making it easier for doctors to generate bills in the Medicare program, and in some cases, overcharging for care. Eric Whitney talked to Denver-area doctors about their experiences with computerized charts.
Tuesday, December 4, 2012

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