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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, November 17, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, November 17, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Cuban-Americans Go Democratic In Florida, one reason for Mitt Romney's loss is that one of the state's most reliable bloc of Republican voters -- Cuban-Americans -- is moving toward the Democrats. Exit polls show Florida's Cuban-American vote was almost evenly split between Romney and President Obama. If Republicans lose Cuban-Americans, it becomes much harder for them to carry the nation's largest swing state in future elections.
  • 1:00 am
    This Week in Northern California Cap-and-Trade in California California launched the country's first large-scale carbon market with the auction of pollution credits. Companies emitting over 25,000 tons in greenhouse gases must have one allowance, or credit, for each metric ton. Many see the system as a win for the environment, while critics say it's a tax on business.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week Obama's Second Term Priorities Regarding the looming fiscal crisis, President Obama signaled that any deficit reduction deal must include revenue increases and that he's ready to battle Congress to reach an agreement before the automatic spending cuts go into effect. Gwen Ifill and guests will examine the Obama administration's second-term priorities and challenges.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club Sandra Day O'Connor In a rare public appearance, former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor will discuss the need for a better-informed citizenry as well as her life, career and views on the role of the Supreme Court. O'Connor, the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court, strongly believes that America suffers from a lack of civic education. To revitalize civic education, she founded iCivics, which uses innovative methods such as video games to engage young people in learning about government and civic participation. Since 2009, iCivics has reached over 1.5 million young people. Justice O'Connor appears in conversation with Mary Bitterman, president of the Bernard Osher Foundation and past chair of the Commonwealth Club's board of governors.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe Could Catalonia Break Off From Spain? Spain's dismal economy has residents of the country's richest region, Catalonia, wondering if they'd be better off going it alone. With their own language and distinct culture, Catalans have long campaigned for autonomy from Spain. The region goes to the polls at the end of this month, in elections seen as an unofficial referendum on independence.
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Burma: A New Way Forward? Burma is back in the international spotlight with a string of important events and domestic reforms, most notably the release of pro-democracy opposition leader and Nobel Peace Prize-winner Aung San Suu Kyi. Many hope that Burma is finally on the cusp of true democratic change after recent reforms undertaken by the ruling military junta, despite being plagued by poverty, sectarian violence and accusations of human rights abuses. The program presents a panel discussion of the current state of affairs in Burma.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life Middle School At the suggestion of a 14-year-old listener, the show presents stories from the awkward, confusing, hormonally charged world of middle school. Including a teacher who transforms peer pressure into a force for good, and reports from the frontlines of the middle school dance.
  • 1:00 pm
    Radio Specials State of the Re:Union Jacksonville, Florida -- Situated over 850 square miles in the northeastern corner of Florida, Jacksonville is not only the largest city in the United States, it also happens to be the hometown of our host, Al Letson. In this episode, Al looks in his own back yard and discovers stories of a sprawling city in the throws of remaking itself. We learn how a proposed anti-discrimination law is both bringing the community together and splitting it apart, how growing blueberries has become a new mission for veterans suffering from PTSD, and how a group of people recovering from disabling accidents are using sports to rebuild their lives.
  • 2:00 pm
    Moyers & Company Hurricanes, Capitalism and Democracy Bill Moyers explores how Hurricane Sandy can spur economic and political transformation in America, with insight from Naomi Klein. Also, Federal Election Commission Chairman Trevor Potter dissects and assesses the impact of spending on the most expensive election in American history.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Living On Earth Extreme Climate Projections Scientists agree that the planet is warming, but there is a wide range of projections as to how hot it's going to get. A new analysis from scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research argues that the more alarming estimates may be the most accurate. John Fasullo, one of the climate scientists responsible for the analysis, joins host Steve Curwood to discuss the future of our warming planet.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion Hotter Than a Texas Pistol The show broadcasts from the Wortham Theater Center in Houston, Texas. Special guests include Texas Renaissance man Joe Ely, 21st Century troubadours Johnnyswim and vocalist Christine DiGiallonardo.
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Paris Lives Martha Plimpton reads "A Bookshop of My Own" and "Setting Up Shop" by Sylvia Beach; Gbenga Akinnagbe reads "No Name in the Street" (excerpt), by James Baldwin; John Shea reads "Hunger Was Good Discipline" by Ernest Hemingway; and Kaneza Schaal reads "The Messy Joy of the Final Throes of the Dinner Party" by Helen Phillips.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life Middle School At the suggestion of a 14-year-old listener, the show presents stories from the awkward, confusing, hormonally charged world of middle school. Including a teacher who transforms peer pressure into a force for good, and reports from the frontlines of the middle school dance.
  • 10:00 pm
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • 11:00 pm
  • 12:00 am
Saturday, November 17, 2012

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