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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, October 18, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, October 18, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Behind the Binders of Women Meme Within a minute of Mitt Romney's story about trying to hire women in his cabinet by using his "binders full of women," Veronica de Souza -- an undecided voter who had just lost her job yesterday -- was on her couch, claiming that phrase on Tumblr. She photoshopped several of her own renditions of women sandwiched in three-ring binders and by 3:00am last night, she'd received some 3,200 submissions.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials BURN: An Energy Journal Election Special: The Power of One -- Part I -- Energy policy -- defining how we use energy to power our economy and our lives -- stands among the most pressing issues politicians will debate in the election run-up. The program features stories illustrating ways that the "power of one" -- whether one man or woman, one event, one idea or one election -- affects energy policy, with a focus on the science behind these energy issues. Guided by host Alex Chadwick, the show explores offshore drilling in the Arctic, follows a ballot initiative in Michigan which could set a new lead in renewable energy standards, and hears the story of the now-defunct White House Office on Energy and Climate.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Changes Coming to Late-Night TV Late-night hosts David Letterman and Jay Leno have been on the air a long time. Younger hosts on cable and later at night are attracting more and more viewers. Now, some of the networks are getting ready to shake up their schedules.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Banning Nudity in San Francisco? When nudity became an everyday occurrence at the Castro's Jane Warner Plaza, San Francisco Supervisor Scott Wiener felt the situation had gotten out of hand. Now, he has proposed legislation requiring people to wear clothing most places in the city, or pay a fine. Is the proposal simply common sense, as supporters argue? Or does it criminalize nudity and hamper freedom of expression?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Louise Erdrich The protaganist of Louise Erdrich's new novel, Joe Coutts, was 13 years old when his mother was brutally raped on their Native American reservation. "The Round House," centers around Joe's story, and how he searches for justice, while trapped between tribal laws and his desire for revenge. New York Times bestselling author Louise Erdrich joins us to discuss the novel, the second book in a planned trilogy that began with the 2009 Pulitzer Prize finalist "The Plague of Doves."
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday What's the Lesson of Lance Armstrong? Before Lance Armstrong was stripped of his titles, before he stepped down at Live Strong, longtime fan Bill Strickland came to his own reluctant conclusion: Armstrong doped. What's the lesson from the verdict on Lance Armstrong?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday What's Changed About Psychiatry Psychiatrist Donald Levin tells the story of a patient telling him that his marriage is crumbling, that he's started to drink again. Dr. Levin told the New York Times, he cut him off. "Hold on," he said, "I'm not your therapist." Many psychiatrists now see patients only to prescribe medicine. Host Neal Conan asks psychiatrists what's changed about their job.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air How Our Devices Change Us Terry Gross talks with Sherry Turkle about how digital devices have altered our lives. For example, kids are texting more and talking less on the phone because with texting they think they can better control what they would say and how long it could take. Turkle is professor of the social studies of science and technology at MIT and the founder and director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self. She's also the author of "Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other."
  • 2:00 pm
    World Translating Birth, Love and Death A language interpreter joins the show to explain her work helping people communicate on 911 calls. She'll also explain why she can never know what happens to them after she hangs up.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Inside the World of Anonymous Donations Anonymous donations to candidates for office are a point of fierce debate. Some say they lead to corruption, while others say they are a necessary part of the election process. The show looks into the secret world of anonymous donations, as part of a collaboration with "Frontline."
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm & 6pm


    Seeds of a Democratic Syria? -- Nineteen months into the uprising against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, supporters of the opposition still have little idea what a post-Assad Syria might look like. Signs of Islamist militant influence and violence against prisoners held by some rebel fighters are worrying. But in one rebel-held northern village along the Syria-Turkey border, activists are racing to nurture the seeds of a secular and democratic local government that they hope will spread to other areas.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Inside the World of Anonymous Donations Anonymous donations to candidates for office are a point of fierce debate. Some say they lead to corruption, while others say they are a necessary part of the election process. The show looks into the secret world of anonymous donations, as part of a collaboration with "Frontline."
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air How Our Devices Change Us Terry Gross talks with Sherry Turkle about how digital devices have altered our lives. For example, kids are texting more and talking less on the phone because with texting they think they can better control what they would say and how long it could take. Turkle is professor of the social studies of science and technology at MIT and the founder and director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self. She's also the author of "Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other."
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials BURN: An Energy Journal with Alex Chadwick Election Special: The Power of One -- Part II -- Energy policy -- defining how we use energy to power our economy and our lives -- stands among the most pressing issues politicians will debate in the election run-up. The program features stories illustrating ways that the "power of one" -- whether one man or woman, one event, one idea or one election -- affects energy policy, with a focus on the science behind these energy issues.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Banning Nudity in San Francisco? When nudity became an everyday occurrence at the Castro's Jane Warner Plaza, San Francisco Supervisor Scott Wiener felt the situation had gotten out of hand. Now, he has proposed legislation requiring people to wear clothing most places in the city, or pay a fine. Is the proposal simply common sense, as supporters argue? Or does it criminalize nudity and hamper freedom of expression?
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered NHL Negotiations Today in Toronto the National Hockey League owners and the players union met to try and get the season back on track. The first two weeks of the season were cancelled after the owners locked out the players over labor disputes. The show checks in with Greg Wyshynski of Yahoo Sports' Puck Daddy blog about the current status of the negotiations and the chances of having a full season.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Boy Scouts Sex Abuse Files Released Records of some 1,200 Boy Scout leaders accused of child molestation between the mid-1960s and the 1980s were made public today. The Oregon Supreme court ordered the release of the so-called "perversion files" over the objections of the Boy Scouts of America, who wanted them to remain confidential.
Thursday, October 18, 2012

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