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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, October 16, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Softbank Acquires Sprint Japan's Softbank has announced it will spend $20 billion to take a majority stake in Sprint-Nextel. The deal will provide Sprint, the third largest carrier in the U.S. market, with some much-needed cash. It also gives Softbank the opening it's been looking for to break into the U.S. market.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Global Security Challenges Facing the Next Administration This election season has been focused primarily on the economy and job creation, but one topic that will surely be debated in the run up to Election Day is the security challenges facing the U.S. and how the next president will handle them. Nothing highlights the importance of this debate like recent attacks on U.S. missions abroad and continued unrest around the world. Drawing on decades of experience within the U.S. government, William Cohen, twentieth U.S. Secretary of Defense and chairman and CEO of the Cohen Group, will provide his insights into these challenges facing the next administration.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Killing Bin Laden, 'The Finish' While U.S. officials were planning their final attack on Osama Bin Laden, their target was hidden in the top two stories of a house. Journalist Mark Bowden says even some residents of the compound didn't know he was there. Bowden joins the show to talk about his new book "The Finish."
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Prop. 30: Gov. Brown's Tax Increase for Education, Public Safety With Proposition 30, Governor Jerry Brown is asking California voters to back an increase in sales and income taxes to support education and public safety. This year's state budget depends on the money from this proposition. Supporters say well-off Californians should give more to sustain public schools. But critics say the measure is a large tax increase which would hurt the state's economy and business climate. And backers of a rival tax initiative -- Prop. 38 -- say Prop. 30 doesn't guarantee new money for education beyond existing general fund spending.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Prop. 38: Molly Munger's Tax Increase for Education Proposition 38 on the November state ballot would increase tax rates on most Californians until 2025, mostly to fund public education. Supporters of the proposition say that unlike rival tax initiative Prop. 30, Prop. 38 earmarks money specifically for schools. Critics call the measure an unfair tax hike on the middle class that will do nothing about the deep funding cuts already looming for education.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Coral Reefs Under Threat Recent studies show that coral cover along Australia's Great Barrier Reef has shrunk by half since the mid '80s as warmer seas, storms and starfish colonies kill off organisms. We'll discuss the health and preservation of these fragile ecosystems.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday The Growing Threat of Cyber War After hackers destroyed 30,000 Saudi computers, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta warned last week that U.S. power grids, communications and military networks could be next. Panetta said, "The collective result could be a cyber pearl harbor."
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Disabled Kids in Nursing Homes Last month, the Justice Department accused the state of Florida of pushing children with disabilities into nursing homes unnecessarily. Across the country, thousands of physically disabled children live in institutions -- isolated from their families and often decades younger than their neighbors.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Inside America's Test Kitchen The show talks with Bridget Lancaster and Jack Bishop of American's Test Kitchen about their new book on the science of cooking. They re-examined techniques they thought were true, such as searing steaks to seal in their juices. They'll reveal why that's not true, and much more.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Politics and the Benghazi Attack Washington was slow last month to identify the attackers at the U.S. embassy in Benghazi. The deaths of four Americans were a tragedy. Now they're politics. As the campaigns clash over the events in Benghazi, the show hears voices from Libya about the attack, and about what's happened since.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace 'How Food Stopped Being Food' Every day, we see countries facing an obesity epidemic, starvation and rising food prices. The show talks to Frederick Kaufman, author of "Bet the Farm: How Food Stopped Being Food."
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm & 6pm


    U.S. Court Overturns Terrorism Conviction -- A U.S. appellate court has overturned the terrorism conviction of a man said to have been Osama bin Laden's driver. Salim Ahmed Hamdan gained fame in 2006 when the U.S. Supreme Court sided with him and found the military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay to be unconstitutional. The tribunals have since been revamped to meet the court's objections. Now the new case finds that Hamdan himself was wrongfully convicted. The crime he is said to have committed -- material support for terrorism -- was not considered a war crime under international law at the time Hamdan was found guilty. Today's ruling may have a greater effect on cases still being tried at Guantanamo. Hamdam himself was released from custody several years ago and returned to his home country, Yemen.
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    NPR News NPR News Special: The Second Presidential Debate NPR News presents live coverage of the second presidential debate between President Barack Obama and GOP challenger Mitt Romney. In this town hall-style debate, voters will control the questions -- but which candidate will command the stage? Guy Raz hosts NPR's coverage, with analysis following the debate from NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving and political analysts E.J. Dionne and Matt Continetti.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Jeffrey Toobin Jeffrey Toobin is a staff writer at The New Yorker and senior legal analyst at CNN. Well known for his ability to illuminate the complexities of our judicial system, Toobin has covered some of the country's most sensational news stories and high-profile cases, such as the Starr investigation of President Clinton, Martha Stewart's legal battles, the O.J. Simpson trial and many Supreme Court cases. His newest book, "The Oath: The Obama White House vs. the Supreme Court," is a gripping insider's account of the ideological war between the John Roberts Supreme Court and the Obama administration, beginning with the moment Roberts blundered through the Oath of Office at Obama's inauguration.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Prop. 30: Gov. Brown's Tax Increase for Education, Public Safety With Proposition 30, Governor Jerry Brown is asking California voters to back an increase in sales and income taxes to support education and public safety. This year's state budget depends on the money from this proposition. Supporters say well-off Californians should give more to sustain public schools. But critics say the measure is a large tax increase which would hurt the state's economy and business climate. And backers of a rival tax initiative -- Prop. 38 -- say Prop. 30 doesn't guarantee new money for education beyond existing general fund spending.
  • 10:30 pm
    Forum Prop. 38: Molly Munger's Tax Increase for Education Proposition 38 on the November state ballot would increase tax rates on most Californians until 2025, mostly to fund public education. Supporters of the proposition say that unlike rival tax initiative Prop. 30, Prop. 38 earmarks money specifically for schools. Critics call the measure an unfair tax hike on the middle class that will do nothing about the deep funding cuts already looming for education.
  • 11:00 pm
    NPR News NPR News Special Presentation The Second Presidential Debate -- NPR News presents coverage of the second presidential debate between President Barack Obama and GOP challenger Mitt Romney. In this town hall-style debate, voters will control the questions -- but which candidate will command the stage? Guy Raz hosts NPR's coverage, with analysis following the debate from NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving and political analysts E.J. Dionne and Matt Continetti.
  • 12:00 am
    NPR News NPR News Special Presentation The Second Presidential Debate -- NPR News presents coverage of the second presidential debate between President Barack Obama and GOP challenger Mitt Romney. In this town hall-style debate, voters will control the questions -- but which candidate will command the stage? Guy Raz hosts NPR's coverage, with analysis following the debate from NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving and political analysts E.J. Dionne and Matt Continetti.
Tuesday, October 16, 2012

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