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Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.

Recently on Radio Specials:

Sat, Oct 26, 2013 -- 2:00 PM
Sat, Oct 26, 2013 -- 2:00 PM Here's the Thing with Alec Baldwin

Film Directors Chris Columbus and Stephen Daldry -- Host Alec Baldwin sits down with film directors Chris Columbus and Stephen Daldry. Columbus has brought to the screen some of the biggest American family films in the last 20 years: "Adventures in Babysitting," "Home Alone," and "Mrs. Doubtfire." Despite his success, Columbus admits that he "always, to this day, [feels] like [he's] gonna walk on a movie and get fired." Stephen Daldry, who recently directed "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," offers a window into his past -- from training as a clown and driving giraffes through Pompeii to being serenaded with Billy Elliot songs by a persistent Elton John.

Fri, Oct 25, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
Fri, Oct 25, 2013 -- 2:00 AM Hearing Voices

Home Team -- In anticipation for the World Series this week, the program shares baseball stories from the Public Radio Hall of Fame. First, the sounds of a St. Louis Cardinals' baseball game are combined with the echoes of Scott Joplin's ragtime and the distinctive calls of Bushy Wushy the Beer Man. The program hears from the 39-year veteran beer vendor at Busch Stadium, who shares his love for the game, the crowd, and the communal spirit of St. Louis. Also, at the Helena Brewers ballpark in Montana, teens get their first, and for most their only, taste of playing pro baseball.

Thu, Oct 24, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
Thu, Oct 24, 2013 -- 8:00 PM Hearing Voices

Home Team -- In anticipation for the World Series this week, the program shares baseball stories from the Public Radio Hall of Fame. First, the sounds of a St. Louis Cardinals' baseball game are combined with the echoes of Scott Joplin's ragtime and the distinctive calls of Bushy Wushy the Beer Man. The program hears from the 39-year veteran beer vendor at Busch Stadium, who shares his love for the game, the crowd, and the communal spirit of St. Louis. Also, at the Helena Brewers ballpark in Montana, teens get their first, and for most their only, taste of playing pro baseball.

Thu, Oct 24, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
Thu, Oct 24, 2013 -- 2:00 AM Burn

Rising Seas -- You know all that abundant, dirt-cheap fossil fuel that's spurred the spectacular development of modern society? Turns out it's not as cheap as we thought. Hydrocarbon energy releases enormous amounts of heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, and the Earth's oceans absorb about 80 percent of that heat. That means sea levels are rising, and they'll continue to rise for hundreds of years to come. While all coastal cities face real trouble, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says Miami is the most vulnerable, in its assessment of threats to 50 major cities worldwide. Parts of Miami will be permanently flooded in as few as 15 years. Host Alex Chadwick talks with people deeply involved in the issues of how and when sea-level rise will begin to inundate Miami, as well as the reasons why waters are rising so quickly along the Atlantic seaboard of North America. To get firsthand reports on the rapidly melting ice sheets of Greenland -- a significant cause of sea-level rise -- Neal Conan, former NPR host and reporter, and Gretel Ehrlich, longtime Greenland explorer and writer, go to Greenland to meet with leading researchers.

Wed, Oct 23, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
Wed, Oct 23, 2013 -- 8:00 PM Burn: An Energy Journal

Rising Seas -- You know all that abundant, dirt-cheap fossil fuel that's spurred the spectacular development of modern society? Turns out it's not as cheap as we thought. Hydrocarbon energy releases enormous amounts of heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, and the Earth's oceans absorb about 80 percent of that heat. That means sea levels are rising, and they'll continue to rise for hundreds of years to come. While all coastal cities face real trouble, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says Miami is the most vulnerable, in its assessment of threats to 50 major cities worldwide. Parts of Miami will be permanently flooded in as few as 15 years. Host Alex Chadwick talks with people deeply involved in the issues of how and when sea-level rise will begin to inundate Miami, as well as the reasons why waters are rising so quickly along the Atlantic seaboard of North America. To get firsthand reports on the rapidly melting ice sheets of Greenland -- a significant cause of sea-level rise -- Neal Conan, former NPR host and reporter, and Gretel Ehrlich, longtime Greenland explorer and writer, go to Greenland to meet with leading researchers.

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