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Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.

Recently on Radio Specials:

Sat, Oct 13, 2012 -- 1:00 PM
Sat, Oct 13, 2012 -- 1:00 PM State of the Re:Union with Al Letson

Tucson, Arizona -- You can't live in Tucson without constantly thinking about borders. The Sonoran desert is divided by a fence at the U.S.-Mexico border. Tucson is a liberal bastion separated from the rest of a staunchly conservative state. And the city itself is criss-crossed by highly charged boundaries cultural, economic and political. We take listeners to this desert city to hear stories about dividing lines, and what happens when people cross them: sometimes risking their lives, and sometimes their reputations ... and once in a while, against the odds, finding harmony in difference.

Fri, Oct 12, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
Fri, Oct 12, 2012 -- 2:00 AM American Radioworks

The Rise of Phoenix: For-Profit Universities Shake Up the Academy -- For-profit colleges have deep roots in American history, but until recently they were a tiny part of the higher education landscape. Now they are big players. More than one in 10 college students attends a for-profit. The rapid rise of these career-oriented schools has provoked heated debate, opening up new conversations about the costs, quality and purpose of higher education. In this documentary, correspondent Emily Hanford examines the history and influence of the University of Phoenix, one of the nation's largest colleges, and explores how Phoenix and other for-profits are shaping the future of higher education.

Thu, Oct 11, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
Thu, Oct 11, 2012 -- 8:00 PM American Radioworks

The Rise of Phoenix: For-Profit Universities Shake Up the Academy -- For-profit colleges have deep roots in American history, but until recently they were a tiny part of the higher education landscape. Now they are big players. More than one in 10 college students attends a for-profit. The rapid rise of these career-oriented schools has provoked heated debate, opening up new conversations about the costs, quality and purpose of higher education. In this documentary, correspondent Emily Hanford examines the history and influence of the University of Phoenix, one of the nation's largest colleges, and explores how Phoenix and other for-profits are shaping the future of higher education.

Thu, Oct 11, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
Thu, Oct 11, 2012 -- 2:00 AM State of the Re:Union with Al Letson

Tucson, Arizona -- You can't live in Tucson without constantly thinking about borders. The Sonoran desert is divided by a fence at the U.S.-Mexico border. Tucson is a liberal bastion separated from the rest of a staunchly conservative state. And the city itself is criss-crossed by highly charged boundaries cultural, economic and political. We take listeners to this desert city to hear stories about dividing lines, and what happens when people cross them: sometimes risking their lives, and sometimes their reputations ... and once in a while, against the odds, finding harmony in difference.

Wed, Oct 10, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
Wed, Oct 10, 2012 -- 8:00 PM State of the Re:Union with Al Letson

Tucson, Arizona -- You can't live in Tucson without constantly thinking about borders. The Sonoran desert is divided by a fence at the U.S.-Mexico border. Tucson is a liberal bastion separated from the rest of a staunchly conservative state. And the city itself is criss-crossed by highly charged boundaries cultural, economic and political. We take listeners to this desert city to hear stories about dividing lines, and what happens when people cross them: sometimes risking their lives, and sometimes their reputations ... and once in a while, against the odds, finding harmony in difference.

Sun, Oct 7, 2012 -- 3:00 PM
Sun, Oct 7, 2012 -- 3:00 PM Tax Revolt 2.0 - Who Will Pay for the Society We Want?

During Jerry Brown's first term as governor, California voters passed Proposition 13 to roll back property taxes and require a two-thirds majority for lawmakers to raise any tax. Today, Californians say they want great schools, effective infrastructure, long prison terms and a social safety net for the poor. But they still don't want to pay more taxes. So, Gov. Brown -- in his second stay in office -- is fighting an uphill battle for a measure asking voters to chip-in more. This election has become a referendum on the size and scope of government.

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