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Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 10:00 PM Hitting a High Note with the Stanford Jazz Festival

The Stanford Jazz Festival kicked off its summer season a few weeks ago with piano great Herbie Hancock. This weekend's headliners include drummer Allison Miller, singer Madeline Eastman, and Brazilian jazz with Trio da Paz. The director of the Stanford Jazz Workshop, Jim Nadel, joins us to talk about the festival's upcoming acts and about teaching jazz to children and aspiring professionals alike.

Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 10:30 AM
Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 10:30 AM Happy 40th Birthday, Kronos Quartet!

The San Francisco-based Kronos Quartet celebrates its 40th anniversary. The group is known for performing a wide range of music, from Mexican folk music to the rock band Nine Inch Nails, and even played live with poet Allen Ginsberg. We talk with the quartet's founder David Harrington about the group's 40-year legacy.

Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 10:00 AM
Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 10:00 AM Hitting a High Note with the Stanford Jazz Festival

The Stanford Jazz Festival kicked off its summer season a few weeks ago with piano great Herbie Hancock. This weekend's headliners include drummer Allison Miller, singer Madeline Eastman, and Brazilian jazz with Trio da Paz. The director of the Stanford Jazz Workshop, Jim Nadel, joins us to talk about the festival's upcoming acts and about teaching jazz to children and aspiring professionals alike.

Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 9:30 AM
Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 9:30 AM KQED Launches New Show Replacing 'This Week In Northern California'

KQED News announced this week that it will launch a new multi-platform service called "KQED Newsroom." Taking its name from the nightly newscast that premiered during the 1968 San Francisco newspaper strike, the new service will integrate television, radio, online, mobile and social media, and will feature interviews, field reporting and debate segments. Longtime journalist and TV anchor Thuy Vu will host the program, and The California Report's host and reporter Scott Shafer will be its senior correspondent. We speak to them about their hopes and goals for the freshly incarnated "KQED Newsroom."

Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 9:00 AM
Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 9:00 AM Genetic Mutation Holds Promise for Cholesterol-Busting Drug

After two women with similar genetic mutations were found to have astoundingly low cholesterol, drug companies began racing to release a super-drug that mimics that cholesterol-destroying mutation. New York Times science writer Gina Kolata and the director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Dr. Gary Gibbons, discuss these findings, and whether a super-drug could make high cholesterol a thing of the past.

Thu, Jul 11, 2013 -- 10:00 AM
Thu, Jul 11, 2013 -- 10:00 AM Rorke Denver: Training Today's Navy SEALs

Lt. Commander Rorke Denver has spent 13 years as a platoon commander and training leader with the Navy SEALs, the country's top special operations force. He has led hostage rescue, counterinsurgency and counter-narcotics operations all over the world, and starred as a Navy SEAL in the film "Act of Valor." He joins us to discuss his new book, "Damn Few: Making the Modern SEAL Warrior," and what it takes to make it through SEAL boot camp and on top secret missions.

Thu, Jul 11, 2013 -- 9:00 AM
Thu, Jul 11, 2013 -- 9:00 AM The Growing Cost of Higher Education

It's not easy being a student today: The federal student loan interest rate doubled on July 1, state financial assistance continues to decline, and university tuition continues to climb. Some say that raising tuition enables schools to subsidize low-income students, but critics say this high-tuition high-aid model actually ends up hurting students in need. We discuss the rising costs of higher education and school loans.

Wed, Jul 10, 2013 -- 10:00 AM
Wed, Jul 10, 2013 -- 10:00 AM Is the Bay Area Too Dog Friendly?

The Bay Area is known for being a dog-loving region, but has our canine adoration reached an unhealthy level? Dogs now accompany us into grocery stores, cafes, and even offices, but some argue that we're excessively spoiling our dogs at the expense of others. We discuss whether our region really has a dog-coddling problem.

Wed, Jul 10, 2013 -- 9:30 AM
Wed, Jul 10, 2013 -- 9:30 AM Adopting Flexible Work Schedules for Families

Five months after Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer banned employees from working from home, San Francisco Supervisor David Chiu is proposing a family-friendly workplace rule that he says would help families balance work and home life. Employees who are parents and caregivers could request a flexible work schedule, including job sharing, telecommuting, or part-time employment. But business owners and other critics say the government shouldn't intrude on how they run their companies. Should San Francisco be the first city in the nation to enact a flexible work provision?

Wed, Jul 10, 2013 -- 9:00 AM
Wed, Jul 10, 2013 -- 9:00 AM Preparing for the Next Transit Crisis

The recent BART strike gave Bay Area commuters a taste of what happens when we lose a major segment of our transit system. So what would happen if more than one system shut down, or if there was a major earthquake? The transit advocacy group SPUR warns that our transportation systems are already at capacity and aren't set to handle rapid population growth. SPUR executive director Gabriel Metcalf joins us to discuss how the Bay Area can become more resilient, and better prepared for the next disruption.

Tue, Jul 9, 2013 -- 10:00 AM
Tue, Jul 9, 2013 -- 10:00 AM The Skyjacking Epidemic: 1968-1972

In 1968, and for five years after, commercial jets were hijacked nearly once a week. Journalist Brendan Koerner tells the story of this criminal epidemic, focusing on the madcap story of a young couple who pulled off the longest distance hijacking in U.S. history. Forum talks with Koerner about the radical 1970s, the country's skyjacking epidemic, and the evolution of aviation security at the time.

Tue, Jul 9, 2013 -- 9:00 AM
Tue, Jul 9, 2013 -- 9:00 AM A Close Look at Long-Term Isolation in State Prison

On Monday, prisoners in special security units at Pelican Bay State Prison will begin a hunger strike. These inmates, who have spent between 10 and 28 years in isolation, are demanding that changes be made to the prison's special housing units, where they spend almost all their time alone. They claim that long-term isolation amounts to cruel and unusual punishment, and that prisoners are sometimes locked in these units for insubstantial reasons. We discuss these issues with a former inmate, the Department of Corrections, an investigative reporter, and a lawyer representing the prisoners in a class action federal lawsuit. The Center for Investigative Reporting and The California Report will feature in-depth series on this topic this week.

Mon, Jul 8, 2013 -- 10:00 AM
Mon, Jul 8, 2013 -- 10:00 AM A Skeptic's Guide to the Mind

Neurologist Robert Burton warns us not to get too excited about groundbreaking discoveries about the brain. In his new book, "A Skeptic's Guide to the Mind: What Neuroscience Can and Cannot Tell Us About Ourselves," Burton urges readers to think more critically about neuroscience research, and asks whether we can truly define the mind with any certainty.

Mon, Jul 8, 2013 -- 9:30 AM
Mon, Jul 8, 2013 -- 9:30 AM Mass Demonstrations in Egypt Gain Momentum

Mass protests, violent clashes and political chaos prevailed in Egypt this weekend following the military's removal of President Mohamed Morsi. As Islamists regionwide decry the ouster and demonstrators on both sides gather violent momentum, we discuss what's next for Egypt and how the U.S. and other world leaders may respond.

Mon, Jul 8, 2013 -- 9:00 AM
Mon, Jul 8, 2013 -- 9:00 AM Investigating the Deadly Asiana Airlines Crash

Investigators are trying to determine why a Boeing 777 crash landed at SFO airport on Saturday, killing two passengers and injuring more than 180 others. Witnesses said the Asiana Airlines flight came in low, and that its tail appeared to hit the runway. The blackened airplane was engulfed in flames and much of its roof had been torn off. This is the first fatal accident involving a Boeing 777; the airlines said it did not appear to be a mechanical problem, but also declined to blame the pilot or the San Francisco control tower. We discuss the crash and what it means for commercial airline safety.

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