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'Class Trumps Race' When It Comes To Internet Access

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A new study from the Pew Research Center finds that age and income play a larger role than race when it comes to high-speed Internet access. Among lower-income African-Americans, smartphones often compensate for not having a broadband connection at home. Smartphones, however, may not be enough.

African-Americans who are young and college graduates are on the same exact footing as their white counterparts when it comes to getting online or using a smartphone. But Aaron Smith, a Pew researcher, says using a mobile device as a primary means of accessing the Internet has drawbacks. There's a lot you can't do on a smartphone.

"For instance," Smith says, "Distance learning or filling out job applications. Those may be much more difficult on a smartphone than on a more traditional device."

Smith says that's a growing problem in a world where an Internet connection is key for everything from accessing education to getting government services.

"So to the extent that this particular group that has a very strong need for some of those services is much less likely to be online, I think that that's a very relevant finding for policy makers, nonprofits and other people who are seeking to serve that community," Smith says.

According to Smith, the biggest takeaway from the study is that class trumps race when it comes to Internet access.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Source: NPR [http://www.npr.org/2014/01/07/260409016/class-trumps-race-when-it-comes-to-internet-access?ft=3&f=1003,1004,1007,1013,1014,1017,1019,1128]

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