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Spark

Threads

For thousands of years, women around the world have expressed their personal histories, societal values and individual eccentricities in the art of fabric, and this tradition now informs the work of many contemporary fine artists.

Spark visits weaver and teacher Consuelo Jimenez Underwood as she constructs the history of indigenous and non-indigenous conflicts through her woven works.

Then we observe the process of painter Andrea Higgins as she finalizes her canvas series "The Presidents' Wives," based on the wardrobes of American first ladies -- from Nancy Reagan's signature red to Lady Bird Johnson's diaphanous yellow chiffon.

Lastly, we join curator of textiles Diane Mott at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco as she gives us a peek at Borneo textiles produced by the Iban women, whose dyeing and weaving skills were the ultimate achievement and thus the path to power in their tribes.

[Original air date: Wed, Jun 25, 2003]

This program is not currently scheduled for broadcast.



Featured Profiles:

Andrea Higgins

Painter Andrea Higgins explores ultimate power dressing with her series of works based on the wardrobe of American First Ladies.

Consuelo Jiménez Underwood

Weaver Consuelo Jiménez Underwood constructs histories of indigenous and non-indigenous conflict through her work.

Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

Visit the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco to meet the professional conservators and the curator of textiles.

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