Donate
Spark

Collaborations with Nature

Since the beginning of time, artists have been fascinated by the patterns of nature. Today, many artists are taking on nature -- not just as subject, but as medium -- employing natural materials, living organisms, even the wind itself, in their work.

Sculptor Ned Kahn uses industrial methods to engineer vast machined installations, revealing the beauty of wind and water in motion.

Engineer/artist Natalie Jeremijenko plants 100 pairs of cloned trees throughout San Francisco, rendering the pattern of differences between neighborhoods and microclimates.

Bill Dan, also known as the "Rock Man of Crissy Field," takes on nature with his bare hands, creating improbable and striking rock sculptures that mesmerize bystanders.

[Original air date: Wed, Apr 09, 2003]

This program is not currently scheduled for broadcast.



Featured Profiles:

Natalie Jeremijenko

See how Natalie Jeremijenko is using genetically identical trees to reveal the patterns of culture and climate.

Ned Kahn

Find out how sculptor Ned Kahn reveals the complex beauty of wind and water in motion.

Bill Dan

Experience the balancing act of Bill Dan, also known as "The Rock Man of Crissy Field."

Also on KQED.org this week ...

The New Environmentalists: From Chicago to Karoo
KQED Celebrates the Earth

April 22 is Earth Day, but KQED is celebrating our planet all month long. Tune in for special programs, attend special events, and find more resources online.

View of a dry Mt. Diablo from Briones Regional Park in the East Bay. (Lauren Sommer/KQED)
Where's the Rain?

KQED covers news about California's drought, offers water-saving tips, and more.

Sponsored by