Donate

Forum

Tue, Jun 18, 2013 -- 9:30 AM

'A Principled Stand': Hirabayashi v. the United States


Download audio (MP3)

Wikimedia Commons
Japanese family heads and persons living alone line up outside a Civil Control Station in San Francisco to appear for "processing" on April 25, 1942.
Wikimedia Commons
Japanese family heads and persons living alone line up outside a Civil Control Station in San Francisco to appear for "processing" on April 25, 1942.

In 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, authorizing the wartime incarceration of Japanese-Americans in what he called "concentration camps." A few Japanese Americans defied that order. One of them, Gordon Hirabayashi, broke curfew and refused to go to camp. He became the face of one of the defining Supreme Court cases of that period, Hirabayashi v. United States. Approaching the 70th anniversary of the case, we talk with Gordon's nephew Lane Hirabayashi about his uncle's life and legacy.

Host: Michael Krasny

Guests:

  • Lane Hirabayashi, professor in Asian American Studies and Chair of the Japanese American Incarceration, Redress, and Community at UCLA; and nephew of Gordon Hirabayashi

More info:

Become a KQED sponsor

Audio Archive

Episodes by Date

Calendar is loading...
Loading...

Be a Part of Forum

Follow us on Twitter

Twitter bird in blue

Stay updated on show topics, relevant articles, and easily submit your questions.